aphids!!!!

Discussion in 'Sick Plants & Problems' started by fellowsped, Sep 17, 2019.

  1. Sep 17, 2019 #1

    fellowsped

    fellowsped

    fellowsped

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    I was watering my plants and noticed little white or transluscent bugs on the leaves and stems. They are very easy to crush and after looking around I am pretty sure they are Aphids. What are my options? I have my grow tent set up currently so they are fairly well contained. What options would you suggest? I REALLY want to get these things taken out ASAP. Thanks in advance for all the help.
     
  2. Sep 17, 2019 #2

    fellowsped

    fellowsped

    fellowsped

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    Diatomaceous earth? Will that work?
     
  3. Sep 18, 2019 #3

    stinkyattic

    stinkyattic

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    Heya, I'm hesitant to say you've got aphids for 2 reasons:
    They are to put it mildly a highly unusual guest in an indoor garden. I've only ever seen them indoors on my mom's hisbiscus, that she leaves out all summer. Possible, but uncommon.
    They are also green. They make a sticky mess, too.
    Do they look plump and round, or like slivers, or like tiny flies with tiny wings? Are there webs? Can you see anything that looks like eggs under the worst affected leaves? Use a magnifying glass to check.
    One of the more common indoor pests is thrips, and what you're describing is something I'd check for thrips first. The larvae look like tiny cream colored splinters of wood. They leave pale munch marks from oval to elongated shapes. Mites leave tiny dots, for comparison.
    Thrips are so easy to get rid of indoors, so if that's what you have, lucky you. Yes, diatomaceous earth is one weapon. Sprinkle some around the base of the stem. Now go find some disposable plates, the foam ones are easiest. Cut a slit from edge to center, then cut a hole in the middle about 2x the diameter of the stem. Make sure the plate is wider than thepot. Slip it on, being sure to prop it up on toothpicks or something so there's air flow under it, tape the seam, and just be sure to keep the floor vacuumed.
    What you've done it disrupted the life cycle. The winglesslarvae cause the mist immediately visible damage. They eat leaves, get fat, and dropto the soil surface to pupate into winged adults, which then lay eggs in the plant tissue and restart the cycle. If the larvae can't find dirt, they die. Hence the plate.
    If you can get pics of the bugs and damage, post em up!
     
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  4. Sep 18, 2019 #4

    fellowsped

    fellowsped

    fellowsped

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    Well i'm not an expert by any means but I did a lot of looking around of pictures and I was pretty sure that's what they were. Half of my plants are clones I clipped off of an outdoor plant. They're def not spider mites. They are very small, white or transluscent or maybe really light green. They are extremely easy to crush and kill.
    Since my plants are very small clones and seedlings I rinsed them off and crushed them off my plants. I went through them again today after work and I still found a few but nowhere near the #s I found before. Probably going to use a couple diff methods as I want these things GONE before I start flowering. I can try to get pictures and post them up tomorrow. Thanks for the help.
     
  5. Sep 19, 2019 #5

    stinkyattic

    stinkyattic

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    Oh shoot yeah if they started outdoors that's a big risk factor for aphids. If you're still vegging you have a lot more options. One easy one is a pyrethrin based spray. One with both rotenone and pyrethrins is even more effective. Disclaimer: do not use in flower. Also cut back your lights (raising them works) and fertilizer for the week of application, and use a canister/cartridge type respirator. The carrier solvents can be just as nasty as the pesticides.
    This is the nuclear option. You'll never see them again.
    If you're flowering tell us; let's look at other options: ) maybe you'll end up with a whole sorority of ladybugs to keep your plants company... but, first things first lol
     

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  6. Sep 20, 2019 #6

    fellowsped

    fellowsped

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    yeah i'm still in veg and they're not very big yet. Tomorrow i'll go to the garden shop and pick up some of that (or similar) spray. Thank you for the help.
     

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