BBP...What are you giving your plants now?!?

Discussion in 'Organic Growing' started by bombbudpuffa, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. Nov 6, 2008 #1

    bombbudpuffa

    bombbudpuffa

    bombbudpuffa

    Sweet Cheeba Chiefa

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    What is this foul looking stuff?!?
    [​IMG]

    It's a special tonic I learned about on another site. It's actually a culture of bacteria...namely Lacto Bacillus:hubba:. Now that stuff on the top is no good for my plants but your pets love it and it's very healthy for them.[​IMG]
    This is what you are left with...
    [​IMG]
    Concentrated Lacto Bacteria. Don't worry, it doesn't smell at any time during making the culture. L Bacillus takes care of foul odors:).
    [​IMG]
    Dilute the culture by 20 with a some fresh water. Thats something like 6 or 7 teaspoons a gallon:).[​IMG]
    PH balance the water and give your ladies a drink:hubba:!
     
  2. Nov 6, 2008 #2

    bombbudpuffa

    bombbudpuffa

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    Sweet Cheeba Chiefa

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    I learned this from a guy on another site and though he gave exact amounts I just used the ingredients listed. You'll need-

    1.2 tblspns White Rice
    2.Half a cup of clean, no chlorine water
    3.Milk

    Step 1:put 1 tablespoon of rice into the half a cup of water. Shake it around a lil until the mixture turns cloudy. Pour the cloudy water into another cup and discard the rice. Repeat step 1 with the other spoonful of rice:).

    Step 2:Let the water and rice dust mix sit in a room with constant temps where it won't be disturbed until you notice a film on top of the liquid. This is bacteria. This may take 2 or 3 days ime.

    Step 3:This is the most important step and makes the L Bacillus dominant in the cultur. Fill the cup(I used an 8 ounce cup)with the rice water to the top with milk. Not to the rim but fill up the cup. Let this sit until the milk curds. This may take 2 or 3 days ime. Like I said before, the curds are good for your pets digestive system and the cats and dogs that are always in my yard love the stuff:p but it's no good for the plants so either throw away or put it on your compost pile. The yellow....ummmm...puss colored liquid is a L Bacillus culture. Just dilute by 20 times and give your ladies a drink:D.
     
  3. Nov 6, 2008 #3

    bombbudpuffa

    bombbudpuffa

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    Sweet Cheeba Chiefa

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    The specific power of Lacto
    Carandang explains that one can also home in on specific microbes for targeted results. The most useful is Lacto bacillus. This microorganism is the workhorse of the human digestive system (though luckily it is also found elsewhere). On the farm it’s used for similar tasks of digestion, something Dierks was relieved to hear last winter after the NOP had mandated that all manure be fully broken down before use. He applied his L. bacillus culture to the mound of manure beside his field, and the composting was faster than ever. Similarly, when sprayed on plants, L. bacilli will digest the biomass on the leaves and stems—dust, for instance, or mud—thus making that free food available to its host.
    “Lacto” is the only microbe Carandang will mention by name, but it is only one of millions that can be collected and used. His instructions are characteristically simple: walk around the farm, find elements you want to reproduce, and collect the microbes that surround them. You could get the microbes from around a particularly robust tomato plant and spray that on next year’s crop. (These concoctions last for months, even years.) To make a growth promoter, find a beanstalk growing like mad, clip the leaves at the top of vine (where all the growth is happening) and make a brew of the resident microbes. Do it with bamboo, or even kelp, which grows inches each day.
    “In the Philippines, we use water lettuce,” Carandang says. “We spray it on the cucumbers and boom! You can do that and be three or five days ahead of the other local farmers. If you’re a market gardener, that can be a big deal.”
    After talking for nearly seven hours straight, Carandang ends the workshop because the daylight is starting to fade. The energy in the barn only rises. Despite the chill in the air and the stiff legs it granted us, we are all now bustling about, discussing how we plan—already—to put the technology to work.
    Alan Mart does organic landscaping and soil management plans. His first thought is to collect the microbes from willow roots, which suffer no transplant shock, and apply them to other, more fragile specimens that he’s planting.
    Patty Salmon is a goat rancher who has been turning her farm organic for years, but has always hit a wall when it comes to feed. With only 8 acres, she can’t possibly grow all the grain and forage for her herd of 100. Carandang explained that his brother, a chicken farmer, ferments his feed and applies Lacto bacillus to it. This causes a pre-digestion that makes a greater percentage of the nutrients available to the chickens, and results in their eating less. Salmon thinks maybe she can extend her reach by doing the same.
    Also conferring are Doug Gallagher and Annabelle Lenderink, from Star Route Farms, one of the oldest and most venerated organic farms in the country. Gallagher heard about beneficial microorganisms 25 years ago, and the farm is already using some store-bought varieties to combat lettuce drop and mildew. They’ve had moderate success, though Gallagher admits they continue using them less because of quantifiable effects and more because he believes in the concept. He’s hopeful that will change with microbes collected from the farm’s forested acreage, which have evolved to thrive in that particular piece of land. And if not, well, at least they’re free.
    Of course Carandang is swarmed with students and their questions after the talk. While waiting their turns, a few pick up the two clean brown bottles on the larger folding table. They contain Carandang’s own Lacto bacillus culture, made back in the Philippines. He brings them along to demonstrate a finished product, but he also has a few for sale. Frankly, though, for all his charms, he’s a terrible businessman. One workshop student carries a bottle over to him and asks the price.



    hxxp://newfarm.rodaleinstitute.org/features/0404/microorgs/index.shtml

    If anyone needs pics on how to make it just ask and i'll post step by step pics:D.
     
  4. Nov 14, 2008 #4

    docfishwrinkle

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    bbp nice read u brought to the table!:aok: after your read which was a great find. its boils down to a lost common knowledge...imo. its nice that its being revived hopefully. my dad acutually ferments his chik feed for years. never understood until :woohoo: now.:D i also found this, its basic soil micro biology http://www.ibiblio.org/rge/faq-html/b-add.htm
     
  5. Nov 14, 2008 #5

    4u2sm0ke

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    Great stuff guys/gals thanks
     
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  6. Nov 14, 2008 #6

    4u2sm0ke

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    From the looks of your Avatar BombB..you been drinking this stuff..lol
     
  7. Nov 14, 2008 #7

    docfishwrinkle

    docfishwrinkle

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    4u thats 2 funny...roflao
     
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  8. Nov 14, 2008 #8

    docfishwrinkle

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    BBP have you ever heard of emerald shaman by adv. nutes? sounds like magical elixir, but it is $70 for 4.25oz!!! im def doing reasearch to make my own ill keep posted. i def want to go completely organic w/ no bought overpriced nutes from these glamourous companies. mass' coco bucket have def made an impact on me. heres a lil info on it:

    Use Emerald Shaman for energized, healthier plants and incredible yields. This all-vegan bio-catalyst product contains certified organic herbs, fruits and vegetables that have been blended and double-fermented over a long process in order to give you the best results possible. Emerald Shaman provides plants with enzymes, nutrients, and growth enhancers which increase cellular and root function, bolster plant immune systems, and improve crop quality and yield.


    •Extremely concentrated formula
    •Contains 88 certified organic botanicals and herbs
    •Very stable shelf life
    •Very low application rate
    •Often provides overnight results

    When using Emerald Shaman for hydroponics gardens, add two drops of product per litre of water into your reservoir. Add one scoop per every six litres, one teaspoon per thirty litres, and one tablespoon per ninety litres. The scoop is provided with the product. When applying Emerald Shaman as a foliar spray, do not apply with lights turned on. Also, be sure to allow the leaves to dry before turning the lights on again.
     
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  9. Nov 14, 2008 #9

    docfishwrinkle

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    hey BBP been doing alot of reading (had day off to go hunting, but raining real good sooo...) ur concoction i believe is the foundation of fermentation process called em1 (effective micro-organisms). heres high nitro fermentation i might try. i reduced it roughly so use whatever naturally is high in N ie:alfalfa. 8 oz veg matter to 2.25 oz molasses.

    Produce your own liquid nitrogen from kakawate




    IF you have a source of kakawate leaves, or other leaves that contain a lot of nitrogen such as those of ipil-ipil and other legumes, you can produce your own liquid nitrogen which you can use to fertilize your vegetables and other crops that require a lot of nitrogen.


    Gil Carandang, an advocate of organic farming, shares this simple procedure of producing liquid nitrogen fertilizer from kakawate leaves. Just take three kilos of fresh kakawate leaves and put them in a suitable container, a plastic pail, for instance. To that, add water just enough to submerge the leaves. Then add one kilo of molasses or brown sugar. Cover the top of the container with a piece of cloth that will allow the entry as well as exit of air.

    After covering the container, place the same in a shady place. The molasses in the mixture will attract beneficial organisms in the air to feed on the molasses which will in turn ferment the leaves. After one week, the leaves will have been fermented. By that time, you might see some mold growth on top of the mixture. That�s all right for as long as the mixture has a pleasant sweet-sour smell. If there is a foul smell, the fermentation was a failure and the mixture should be discarded.

    If the smell resembles that of a pickle, the fermentation is very good. Then you can extract the liquid from the fermented stuff. Press the liquid out of the solids and strain it. That�s your natural liquid nitrogen which you can use to fertilize your favorite plants.

    It is very economical because you only have to mix two to six tablespoons of the extract per gallon of water for spraying on the plants. The liquid fertilizer can also be used to drench the root zone of the plants.

    For leafy vegetables that require a lot of nitrogen, Carandang recommends the spraying of the extract once or twice weekly.

    If you want to produce your own natural potassium fertilizer for use in fruit bearing trees, you can do that by fermenting raw materials rich in potassium. Among potassium- rich materials are banana leaves, trunks and fruits. The same procedure as in the liquid nitrogen fermentation is followed.
     
  10. Nov 14, 2008 #10

    docfishwrinkle

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    heres the mother load, very interesting & easy.
    hxxp://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech/SoilWiki/message-archives/composttea+soilfoodweb+soilquality/4/msg00069.html
     
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  11. Nov 14, 2008 #11

    bombbudpuffa

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    Sweet Cheeba Chiefa

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    Nice find DFW:). I know you can use stuff like nettles and alfalfa for ferts too but i've never heard of kakawate.
     
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  12. Nov 14, 2008 #12

    bombbudpuffa

    bombbudpuffa

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    Sweet Cheeba Chiefa

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    No, i've never heard of it. From the sounds of it it's probably some kind of tea made from fruits and veggies. I made this stuff from strawberries once and every since my first time using it I decided to keep making and using the stuff. I took an empty fert bottle and filled it almost full with chopped strawberries. Then I added 1 teaspoon of some earth juice water that I had bubbling(to add a lil bacteria to the SB and water). I let it sit for a few days and noticed the bottle had swollen so I slowly opened the top and released the gasses. I took a whiff and it smelled exactly like strawberry yogurt(you might remember the thread:D). I'm guessing it's some sort of culture but i'm not sure of what. I use it on every plant I grow now in late bloom:).
     
  13. Nov 14, 2008 #13

    docfishwrinkle

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    yeah im sure its native to phillipines like Gil Carandang.
     
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  14. Nov 14, 2008 #14

    docfishwrinkle

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    whats ur verdict w/ finishing off like this? have a ? not really related, but do most strains go through 2nd growth spurt around 6-7 wks flower. like calyxes swell?
     
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  15. Nov 15, 2008 #15

    bombbudpuffa

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    Sweet Cheeba Chiefa

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    Ime, the calyxes get a lot bigger when it's close to harvest. The calyxes on my kush cross have gotten huge in the last week:).
     
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  16. Nov 15, 2008 #16

    born2killspam

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    One very effective micro-organism that could be innoculated into soil that hasn't been mentioned yet is Aspergillus oryzae.. It is used in the fermentation of saki, and 'real' soy-sauce (Technically, like tabasco sauce, soy-sauce must be fermented to be considered real).. Perhaps adding malted rice (rice that has been malted by the A. oryzae) as a soil additive would be an ideal innoculation means since it would carb-load the soil very effectively as well..
    You may be able to get it sold as 'koji' in asain food stores, but if not its easy to find online, just google 'koji spores'..
     
  17. Nov 15, 2008 #17

    andy52

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    very informative thread you got going BBP.wish i would have had this while i was soil growing.
     
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  18. Nov 17, 2008 #18
    Nice stuff bomb! I am going to try this!
     
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  19. Nov 17, 2008 #19

    toke@smoke420

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    im going to make some right now, great read bro i was looking all over the net for diy organic ferts last night and found nothing, but your recipes... can you elaborate on the strawberry method or a link to the thread, i want try this also... much mojo for you my mann..

    how often do you feed them with the first mix, and how long before harvest do you start the strawberry mix?
     
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  20. Nov 17, 2008 #20

    bombbudpuffa

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    Sweet Cheeba Chiefa

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    I didn't find it on the net...kind of my own concoction:D. I just thought fruits would be good for flowering so I found a soft flesh fruit and let it liquify. I added a lil tea so the bacteria in it would help it along a lil. You'll have to open the container everyday for about a week then it should be fine. Easy to make really...just water and strawberries and let sit for around a month.
     

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