blowing breakers

dozer42

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2006
Messages
106
Reaction score
0
i am looking to add more electricty to my room.

the first thing that i want to do is figure out how big our breaker is.
next i want to test other outlets through out the basement and try to find a outlet on a seperate breaker. then run extention cords into my room.
last i want to figure out how many lights and fans ect. i can run based on the availbilty of electricty.


how can you safely blow the breaker from the outlet? our breaker box has around 50 breakers and some can not be turned off.
 
S

Stoney Bud

Guest
dozer42 said:
i am looking to add more electricty to my room.

the first thing that i want to do is figure out how big our breaker is.
next i want to test other outlets through out the basement and try to find a outlet on a seperate breaker. then run extention cords into my room.
last i want to figure out how many lights and fans ect. i can run based on the availbilty of electricty.


how can you safely blow the breaker from the outlet? our breaker box has around 50 breakers and some can not be turned off.
You don't want to "blow" a breaker from an outlet.

With two people, it's easy to find a breaker switch. One stays by the outlet with a lamp plugged into it and on.

The other shuts off breakers until the light goes off.

That's your breaker.

If you don't know what you're doing with this stuff, hire an electrician.

You don't ever want to hear a fireman say:

"Is this your house? Yes? Officer, arrest this man"

Nasty thought that is.
 

cyberquest

Junior GreenThumb
Joined
Dec 23, 2006
Messages
770
Reaction score
82
yeah do it like stoney said, dont try to pop a breaker, a fire is just one problem, electricution is another. use the two man trick he said, thats how we find ours, one man in the basement another one yelling "thats the one" :D

and running big amounts of power through and extension cord isnt that safe either. extention cords are normally made of smaller wires that create resistance, resistance = HEAT, heat = fire. they have cords that are made to handle high power loads but are more expensive, but not as expensive as replacing your house i would imagine.

also make sure at the end of the cord is a surge protector with a built in breaker, that way it might trip that breaker before tripping the one in the basement.
 

dozer42

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2006
Messages
106
Reaction score
0
ok i will use the light trick. to make it worth while i will just plug lights into all the outlets i want to test. then as the breakers start going off, lights go off.

i already have heavy duty extention cords with surge blockers and fuses. so good in that dept.

how many lights (600w) are you allowed to run on a 15 amp breaker?
 

dozer42

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2006
Messages
106
Reaction score
0
never mind that question. found the answer right above my post. that was only after searching for it for a while.

thanks
 
S

Stoney Bud

Guest
Hey dozer42, make sure you don't overload your circuit. The lights should have an Amperage rating on them. On a 15 amp circuit, never run more than half, or 7.5 amps of usage. If you run more than that, it will not be safe for long time usage. The wires will heat up and the insulation will start to break down. So, on your 15 amp circuit, run only 7.5 amps of draw.

I would suggest to you to buy or borrow an ammeter. They sell the kind that you can simply clip around the wire and it will tell you the draw of that item.

Do that for each light and add them together until you get to 7.5 amps.

Cool?
 

longtimegrower

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2006
Messages
837
Reaction score
449
Location
Dixie land
Stonny Bud that was well said. Remember the story`s we have all heard we went to johns funeral and tossed a Bud in the hole for him to smoke in the after life. I would say dozer just by how you asked that question i would stay away from the lectricity. You will be wearing a drool bib for the remainder. Lol slim
 

MJ20

Super Sativa
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
963
Reaction score
56
Today I talked to an electrician who didn't recommened against running 12.3A/15A on a circuit...he did however warn of overloading it past 15A and taking time and finding each outlet that runs on that one breaker.He also mentioned that the wires in the breaker wouldn't burn up even though something trips. (something about them having a real high A res?) I asked him the same thing you guys said>half of the circuit etc and that's what he said.
 
S

Stoney Bud

Guest
Hey caribbean_smoker_20, your Electrician friend is technically correct. The rule of thumb is 80% load. I always suggest half load to be on the safe side. In high use applications like 24/7 HPS lighting, the rate at which the insulation of the wire between the light and the outlet will break down is increased. If the wire were replaced on a regular basis of about a year, then I would also suggest going with an 80% load.

I'd always rather be more safe than less safe. Even in fractions.

If I could just find an electrician that was also cool with weed, I could explain the *real* reason I'm asking...

Until then, I ask a group of the senior electricians that work out of the shop I work in. I told them I'm going to use the light as a 24/7 light for supplemental lighting in my outside veggie greenhouse.

Then they got all worked up and started talking about different grades of wire, types of wire, methods and the like, and both of them forgot I was even standing there.

The root of what they were saying is that *if* the proper wire was used, then 80% for 24/7 would be just fine.

If you guys want me to, I'll ask them to write down the name and gauge of wire they all settled on as being the best.

These guys scare me when they all start talking...

They *did* suggest buying a light that was switchable to 220 volts and to hook it up to 220 instead of 110. They said it would run *WAY* more efficiently. It involves using a dual breaker in your panel box after wiring the light correctly.

They said it would greatly decrease the cost of running the light. I thought that was very interesting. I'm going to try to get them to explain that to me using ohm's law. I can do the math if they explain it that way.
 

MJ20

Super Sativa
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
963
Reaction score
56
^^hehe>Yeah>the guy started spewing out electrical jargon and I had to tell him to slow down.rofl.I wouldn't run it over half etc. neways>just personal safety too I guess!
 

Weeddog

Tokin Dog
Joined
Jan 20, 2005
Messages
532
Reaction score
79
Stoney Bud said:
They *did* suggest buying a light that was switchable to 220 volts and to hook it up to 220 instead of 110. They said it would run *WAY* more efficiently. It involves using a dual breaker in your panel box after wiring the light correctly.

They said it would greatly decrease the cost of running the light. I thought that was very interesting. I'm going to try to get them to explain that to me using ohm's law. I can do the math if they explain it that way.
I run my lights on 220 instead of 110 because it will draw half the current on 220 than it does on 110. Ohms law says so. But i think the total power consumption will be about the same. The lower current draw allows you to use smaller wire without overheating it. I am running two 400w hps on a #10 wire and is running cold. I could probably get away with #12 or 14.


800w / 110v = 7.27A
800w / 220v = 3.64A
 

justagrower

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2007
Messages
89
Reaction score
2
hey all...just thought id let you know im an electrican and if i can help...let me know!
 
S

Stoney Bud

Guest
Weeddog said:
I run my lights on 220 instead of 110 because it will draw half the current on 220 than it does on 110. Ohms law says so. But i think the total power consumption will be about the same. The lower current draw allows you to use smaller wire without overheating it. I am running two 400w hps on a #10 wire and is running cold. I could probably get away with #12 or 14.


800w / 110v = 7.27A
800w / 220v = 3.64A
Yeah, I cornered the guy again and asked about the cost factor. He said it would cost about the same, but would make the light last a lot longer because of less heat being produced.
 

KADE

Aero Lord
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
1,924
Reaction score
124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weeddog
I run my lights on 220 instead of 110 because it will draw half the current on 220 than it does on 110. Ohms law says so. But i think the total power consumption will be about the same. The lower current draw allows you to use smaller wire without overheating it. I am running two 400w hps on a #10 wire and is running cold. I could probably get away with #12 or 14.


800w / 110v = 7.27A
800w / 220v = 3.64A


Stoney Bud said:
Yeah, I cornered the guy again and asked about the cost factor. He said it would cost about the same, but would make the light last a lot longer because of less heat being produced.
Unless you have a industrial power rate.... where amps makes a big ole difference... it just so happens when my garage was built I zoned it industrial. =) I didn't plan on any of this at the time... I just figured if i wanted to open a welding shop or whatever I'd do it that way so the houses around couldn't say nething.
 

KADE

Aero Lord
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
1,924
Reaction score
124
Oh, I forgot.... normal wire for outlets is 14-2... I forget 220 wiring... i can find out if u want... I always use 220 wiring when I make (yes make... I know, i'm lame) extension cords. I dont like the low gauge crap they have at stores.. and the price they want for them.
 

Latest posts

Top