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Flowering NPK

D

dman1234

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Low#-Hi #-Hi #

its a ratio, so it doesnt matter what the #'s are

for example
4-7-8

or
10-19-19

its all the same.
 

MrBobMarleyJr

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cool so as long as the N is lower then a P and K....... Should the P or K be higher then one or the other for better results
 
D

dman1234

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MrBobMarleyJr said:
cool so as long as the N is lower then a P and K....... Should the P or K be higher then one or the other for better results

their usually going to be close if not the same.

but mine are 4-7-8
 

Hamster Lewis

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Yeah just keep the N low...too much N and I believe you can retard flowering. I use GH 3 part and don't use the N (grow) at all in flower unless they show signs of early yellowing. The Micro and Bloom do all the hvy lifting.
 

thomas 11111

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This may help:
A common mistake for growers when they reach the flowering stage is to start hitting the plants with a high P fert like 10-60-10, continuing to use this blend exclusively, and when their plants start experiencing a deficit of N or micros as reflected by the dropping of lower leaves and chlorosis, they wonder why. Plants flower as a response to long nights, not because of fert blends high in P. A ratio of 10-60-10 is WAY to high in P. The plant will only take what it needs and compete for other elements that may be more important at the time. You may have heard that too much N can inhibit flowering. No question about it, exclusive use of a plant food that is rich in N such as blood meal, a 5-1-1 blend, or ammonium nitrate may inhibit flowering especially if the phosphorous level is low, but most balanced blends have sufficient amount of P to do the job. Manufacturers/horticulturists will give you element analysis and what effect the elements have on plant growth, but remember this does not necessarily mean you will get better yields. Using a high P fert exclusively during flowering can actually work against you. It's an abundant amount of healthy leaves going into 12/12 that produce a lot of bud, not high P ferts. I rotate fert blends as the plant *requires* them, not because it is "the thing to do." For example, when your plants are going thru the stretch phase during early flowering, they may need more N, especially if you're getting some yellowing in the lower/mid leaves. Give up the cannabis paradigms, and give them what they need. Go back to mild high P fert when the stretch ends, maintaining the foliage in a healthy state of growth until harvest for maximum yields. A ratio of 1-3-2 is good.
Good luck:48:
 

Hushpuppy

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:cool: :yeahthat: I can't add anymore to what Thomas just said. ;) however I'm not the brightest lightbulb in the pack:doh:
 

Hick

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thomas 11111 said:
This may help:
A common mistake for growers when they reach the flowering stage is to start hitting the plants with a high P fert like 10-60-10, continuing to use this blend exclusively, and when their plants start experiencing a deficit of N or micros as reflected by the dropping of lower leaves and chlorosis, they wonder why. Plants flower as a response to long nights, not because of fert blends high in P. A ratio of 10-60-10 is WAY to high in P. The plant will only take what it needs and compete for other elements that may be more important at the time. You may have heard that too much N can inhibit flowering. No question about it, exclusive use of a plant food that is rich in N such as blood meal, a 5-1-1 blend, or ammonium nitrate may inhibit flowering especially if the phosphorous level is low, but most balanced blends have sufficient amount of P to do the job. Manufacturers/horticulturists will give you element analysis and what effect the elements have on plant growth, but remember this does not necessarily mean you will get better yields. Using a high P fert exclusively during flowering can actually work against you. It's an abundant amount of healthy leaves going into 12/12 that produce a lot of bud, not high P ferts. I rotate fert blends as the plant *requires* them, not because it is "the thing to do." For example, when your plants are going thru the stretch phase during early flowering, they may need more N, especially if you're getting some yellowing in the lower/mid leaves. Give up the cannabis paradigms, and give them what they need. Go back to mild high P fert when the stretch ends, maintaining the foliage in a healthy state of growth until harvest for maximum yields. A ratio of 1-3-2 is good.
Good luck:48:
GREAT iinfo'/advice thomas!! For years, I've practiced running higher N veg' nutes for the first couple weeks of flower. "I" believe they "need" it, and it inhibits early yellowing, dieing off.. :)
 

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