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Here's some organic soil mixes.

Discussion in 'Organic Growing' started by ozzydiodude, Oct 18, 2013.

  1. Oct 18, 2013 #1

    ozzydiodude

    ozzydiodude

    ozzydiodude

    Well-Known Member

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    This was originally posted At Breedbay by Mr Mojorising and c&p here with his permission
    I did have a search and didn't see some of these soil mixes so thought i'd add them.

    Below are various "recipes" for both organic fertilizers and organic soil mixes.

    Mix and match formulas

    Pick one source from each category. The results will vary in composition from 1-2-1 to 4-6-3, but any mixture will provide a balanced supply of nutrients that will be steadily available to plants and encourage soil microorganisms.

    Nitrogen
    2 parts blood meal
    3 parts fish meal

    Phosporous
    3 parts bone meal
    6 parts rock phosphate or colloidal phosphate

    Potassium
    1 part kelp meal
    6 parts greensand

    source: Rodale Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening

    More Organic Fertilizer Mixes

    N P K
    2 - 3.5 - 2.5
    1 part bone meal
    3 parts alfalfa hay
    2 parts greensand
    N P K
    2 - 4 - 2
    4 parts coffee grounds
    1 part bone meal
    1 part wood ashes
    N P K
    2 - 4 - 2
    1 part leather dust
    1 part bone meal
    3 parts granite dust
    N P K
    2 - 8 - 2
    3 parts greensand
    2 parts seaweed
    1 part dried blood
    2 parts phosphate rock
    N P K
    2 - 13 - 2.5
    1 part cottonseed meal
    2 parts phosphate rock
    2 parts seaweed
    N P K
    3.5 - 5.5 - 3.5
    2 parts cottonseed meal
    1 part colloidal phosphate
    2 parts granite dust
    N P K
    2.5 - 6 - 5
    1 part dried blood
    1 part phosphate rock
    4 parts wood ashes
    N P K
    0 - 5 - 4
    1 part phosphate rock
    3 parts greensand
    2 parts wood ashes
    N P K
    3 - 6 - 3
    1 part leather dust
    1 part phosphate rock
    3 parts seaweed
    N P K
    3 - 7 - 5
    1 part dried blood
    1 part phosphate rock
    3 parts wood ashes
    N P K
    3 - 8 - 5
    1 part leather dust
    1 part phosphate rock
    1 part fish scrap
    4 parts wood ashes
    N P K
    2.5 - 2.5 - 4
    3 parts granite dust
    1 part dried blood
    1 part bone meal
    5 parts seaweed
    N P K
    4 - 5 - 4
    2 parts dried blood
    1 part phosphate rock
    4 parts wood ashes
    N P K
    6 - 8 - 3
    2 parts fish scrap
    2 parts dried blood
    1 part cottonseed meal
    1 part wood ashes
    1 part phosphate rock
    1 part granite dust


    Herbal Tea Plant Food

    1 t Comfrey leaves
    1 t Alfalfa leaves
    1 t Nettle leaves
    1 Qt boiling water

    Steep for 10 min. and let cool until luke warm. Drain the leaves out and add the luke warm tea to your plants to keep them healthy and vibrant!

    The reason for adding slightly warm tea (or water) to your plants is that they will be able to absorb the needed nutrients more easily by keeping the root pores open verses cold tea (or water) will have a tendency to restrict the pores, meaning a much slower process of absorption.

    Comfrey is called knitbone or healing herb. It is high in calcium, potassium and phosphorus, and also rich in vitamins A and C. The nutrients present in comfrey actually assist in the healing process since it contains allantoin.
    Alfalfa is one of the most powerful nitrogen - fixers of all the legumes. It is strong in iron and is a good source of phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and trace minerals.
    Nettles are helpful to stimulate fermentation in compost or manure piles and this helps to break down other organic materials in your planting soil. The plant is said to contain carbonic acid and ammonia which may be the fermentation factor. Nettles are rich in iron and have as much protein as cottonseed meal.

    copied from onlinepot.

    never heard of leather dust before,just keep being amazed at the variety of organics.

    keep seeing crushed hemp seeds on some fishing bait shops(my new source for organics great for any 'Meals really cheap),my thinking is the area around the plants in the hills and valleys growing wild must have an abundance of crushed\spent seed shells and crushed seeds so might give that a go next.
    _
     

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