Is tap root length important in a photo-period, outdoor, soil, container grow?

carpas48

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In reading about air pots and other new container designs that indicate that what you really want is a slew of lateral feeder roots instead of some kind of macho tap root that just wants to get longer.....

If this is so, how does one accomplish this in a container? How to prevent the tap root from gobbling up all of the nutrients so it can mindlessly circle the container at the expense of actually nourishing the stuff above ground.

I understand that in nature, the plant just wants to reproduce and is not interested in providing us all with a bountiful harvest; just enough to procreate and she will be happy. This would explain its propensity to invest heavily in a robust anchor/tap root so she can survive to fertilization, flower, and seed?

But I want more....

I'm imagining a DIY airpot for all roots: some how getting air to the tap root,at the proper stage, so it shuts itself down, releasing that energy to develop more feeder roots and the glorious plant above ground.

So here goes: hot-glue a 3 - 4 inch pot upside down to the 5 (or more?) gallon container. The small pot would have holes drilled in its bottom (now its top) to allow light to pass thru the bottom of the big container (that also has a hole directly below) if there is an airspace between the big container and the ground. Meanwhile, the actual grow container sides have also been modified for air pruning of the laterals so that more of these roots develop.
Any thoughts?
 

boo

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yo momma...
I've been using pots with vertical slits down the sides for a decade or more...they self prune and force the roots to grow back into the soil mass rather than circle it thereby stunting the plant...doesn't adress the tap root but it makes for super healthy and happy flowers...
 

Bugus_Monkey

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I would say that some of them do. I thought this one was a bunch of little ones all twisted together but when I harvested, I had to cut that out of the basket with wire nips. It was solid as a rock. Then again the front 2 plants do not have one. I know I've had them full on outdoors.
 

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WeedHopper

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I hate to disagree with you brother because your always on point but this time I have too bro.

Most plants, including cannabis plants, have a taproot. The taproot is the first root formed from the seed of the plant upon germination that taps into the soil, and while the plant will have other roots, it will remain the longest and thickest. It will also grow the deepest in the growing medium. Think of a carrot – the part that we consume is actually the plant’s taproot.

In some plants, such as carrots or radishes, the taproot is actually an organ that stores the major nutrients and vitamins. As a result, these taproots can be cultivated for eating. Other plants with taproots include parsnip, parsley, dandelion, sugar beet, burdock and beetroot, among others.

Not all plants have taproots, but those that do have specific benefits over those that do not. Because the taproot burrows much deeper into the ground, these plants are generally much more drought tolerant, as they can continue to locate moisture deep in the earth even in dry conditions. A butterfly weed can grow in sand or gravel because its taproot extends beyond the surface and is able to draw water along its entire depth. In addition to its water-gathering ability, a taproot provides additional stability in high winds for tall trees like the oak or ash. Another benefit is that taproots can also store nutrients for the plant, providing nutrition and helping to make plants more self-sufficient.

Of course, taproots also cause some problems. A taproot on a tree like an oak usually isn’t an issue for gardeners, but they can be problematic for weed control. Pulling a dandelion, for example, can be difficult because they generally snap off at the top of the taproot. If the taproot is not completely removed from the soil a new plant will grow from it.
 
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WeedHopper

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Here is another good read.

Root structure
It could be said that the root, or root system, has a pyramidal structure. The main tap root grows vertically down into the soil, and its secondary offshoots spread themselves throughout the substrate. In turn, these secondary roots develop small offshoots, called capillaries or simply root hairs, which are responsible for the collection and transportation of water and nutrients for the entire plant.
 

carpas48

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Here is another good read.

Root structure
It could be said that the root, or root system, has a pyramidal structure. The main tap root grows vertically down into the soil, and its secondary offshoots spread themselves throughout the substrate. In turn, these secondary roots develop small offshoots, called capillaries or simply root hairs, which are responsible for the collection and transportation of water and nutrients for the entire plant.
Thank you very much!!!
 

carpas48

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I've been using pots with vertical slits down the sides for a decade or more...they self prune and force the roots to grow back into the soil mass rather than circle it thereby stunting the plant...doesn't adress the tap root but it makes for super healthy and happy flowers...

Hi:
Got some more questions:
Do you line the pots with anything to keep soil from leaking out?
What size pots do you use?
Assuming you are an outdoor grower, what type of climate do you have to deal with?
Thanks for your suggestion too.
 

WeedHopper

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My bad lol. I would have sworn I remembered reading that somewhere. I guess I made it up 😂 I won't be offended if y'all scrub that one
Done. Ya fking stoner.😁
Brother I say shit all day long my Wife sets me straight on.🤪
 

Bubba

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Two things I've noticed about tap roots. Clones don't seem to have them, and I recall from over grow, they were making bonsai mothers by cutting the tap root early on. That's the limit of what I know, not much.

Bubba
 

spunom

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I was tilling my soil the other day, and sure as shi.t there was an old taproot. Crow doesn't taste good 🤣🤣
 

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