Is this a male or female???

aamcgill480

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@gmo @SubmarineGirl @boo it’s really hard for me to tell… this is my crack at breeding and this is my “F1” Donny Burger Female x Purple Punch OG female pollen
 

aamcgill480

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You have some kind of hybrid cannabis/hops 🤣 kidding… I have no clue but it looks suspicious as heck
Ok… so I’m not just buggin’ owt… Thank you, I’ll keep a close eye…
 

oldfogey8

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@gmo @SubmarineGirl @boo it’s really hard for me to tell… this is my crack at breeding and this is my “F1” Donny Burger Female x Purple Punch OG female pollen
That is one weird looking flower. Doesn’t have pollen sacs that I can see from the pictures. ‘Purple Punch OG female pollen’ has me scratching my head though…
 

RosterMan

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I remember having a mutant with buds very similar looking
Mine were small and very hard and strange looking.
Never did find out why the buds did this I tossed it
 

bigsur51

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it could also be what is called a whorled calyx …I’ve seen it a few times on some ak47’s

couldn’t find any decent cannabis photos



Whorl (botany)
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Leaf whorls on a herbaceous Lilium michiganense

Leaf whorls on a woody tree, Brabejum stellatifolium
In botany, a whorl or verticil is an arrangement of leaves, sepals, petals, stamens, or carpels that radiate from a single point and surround or wrap around the stem or stalk.[1][2] A leaf whorl consists of at least three elements; a pair of opposite leaves is not called a whorl.
For leaves to grow in whorls is fairly rare except in plant species with very short internodes and some other genera (Galium, Nerium, Elodea etc.). Leaf whorls occur in some trees such as Brabejum stellatifolium and other species in the family Proteaceae (e.g., in the genus Banksia). In plants such as these, crowded internodes within the leaf whorls alternate with long internodes between the whorls.
The morphology of most flowers (called cyclic flowers) is based on four types of whorls:
  1. The calyx: zero or more whorls of sepals at the base
  2. The corolla: zero or more whorls of petals above the calyx
  3. The androecium: zero or more whorls of stamens, each comprising a filament and an anther
  4. The gynoecium: zero or more whorls of carpels, each consisting of an ovary, a style, and a stigma
A flower lacking any of these floral structures is said to be incomplete or imperfect.[3] Not all flowers consist of whorls since the parts may instead be spirally arranged, as in the family Magnoliaceae.
 

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