June Issue of Nat'l Geographic

burnin1

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From SFGate:

National Geographic on marijuana science: an embarrassment of riches

Posted on May 18, 2015 at 9:33 am by David Downs in featured, Health, Science
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The June issue of National Geographic features an in-depth look at the science and medicine of cannabis that’s guaranteed to open a few minds.
NatGeo hangs out with the discoverer of THC, Raphael Mechoulam, who reports: “We have just scratched the surface … we may well discover that cannabinoids are involved in some way in all human diseases.”
The magazine goes inside a 20,000-plant grow in Denver, and also interviews a biochemist who is studying the plant’s anti-tumor properties:
“… tumors in a third of the rats were eradicated and in another third, reduced. …’The problem is,’ he says, ‘mice are not humans. We do not know if this can be extrapolated to humans at all.’”
And NatGeo profiles some medical marijuana refugees in Colorado who are there treating their daughter’s intractable seizures.
“Meagan experimented with high-CBD oil. The seizures all but stopped. She weaned Addy off some of her other meds, and it was as though she’d come back from a coma. ‘It sounds like a small thing,’ says Meagan. “But’if you have a child who smiles for the first time in many, many months, well, your whole world changes.’
By early last year the Patricks had made up their minds. They would move to Colorado to join the movement. ‘It was a no-brainer,’ Meagan says. ‘If they were growing something on Mars that might help Addy, I’d be in my backyard building a spaceship.’”
The piece concludes with a portrait of a geneticist assembling the raw, unsorted code of cannabis DNA into its proper order.
“‘… with this cannabis work, the science will not be incremental. It will be transformative. Transformative not just in our understanding of the plant but also of ourselves—our brains, our neurology, our psychology. Transformative in terms of the biochemistry of its compounds. Transformative in terms of its impact across several different industries, including medicine, agriculture, and biofuels. It may even transform part of our diet—hemp seed is known to be a ready source of a very healthy, protein-rich oil.’Cannabis, Kane says, ‘is an embarrassment of riches.’”

http://blog.sfgate.com/smellthetrut...marijuana-science-an-embarrassment-of-riches/
 

Rosebud

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Awesome! Thank you for posting this. I love that last paragraph, have to wonder if he/she was really stoned.. Love it. I am so happy i lived long enough to see this country finally change.
 

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From the Huffington Post:

National Geographic's upcoming June cover features one word bold enough to grab just about anyone's attention: "WEED."
But it's not the typical, negative portrayal of the drug you might assume.
The cover story, written by Hampton Sides, dives into the emerging research on marijuana worldwide, and how the drug might actually fight and treat many advanced diseases.
The cover, as seen below in both print and digital, shows a marijuana plant stemming from the top border:


Of the many developing uses for the drug, the magazine explores a cannabis oil extract being used on children to treat serious health conditions like cancer and epilepsy. The in-depth look into the scientific and medical potential behind the leafy green plant, and the people who harvest it, will make readers view the drug like they never have before.

More:

Weed Science National Geographic Medical Marijuana National Geographic Cover
 

yooper420

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Wow, it`s about time. Maybe this will make people take their heads outta their arses and wake up to the truth, not the "Reefer Madness" lies.
 

burnin1

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Yes it is great to see a national publication tell the truth about cannabis.

This is not the National Geographic my Grandfather used to read for sure!

:watchplant:
 

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Very cool posting. Thank You
 

burnin1

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More from the HuffPost

Mmm Blueberry Cheesecake sounds delicious!

The Huffington Post | By Paige Lavender & Chris McGonigal Posted: 05/21/2015 12:44 pm EDT Updated: 05/27/2015 11:59 am EDT
Take A Look Inside The World Of Medical Marijuana

An exploration of the science behind marijuana is featured in the June issue of National Geographic, which hits newsstands on May 26.
Along with a video about children caught up in the medical marijuana debate, NatGeo also includes photos of those involved in the business of medical marijuana, including harvesters and children who benefit from oils derived from marijuana plants.



See photos from National Geographic below:

  • Lynn Johnson / National Geographic
    Marijuana’s advocates believe the long-maligned plant can enhance life—and help deliver people from sickness and pain. A Seattle cannabis worker cradles the resin-dusted bud of a strain called Blueberry Cheesecake.

  • Lynn Johnson / National Geographic
    Lily Rowland receives a dose of an oil derived mainly from cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive substance in marijuana. She used to suffer hundreds of seizures with violent convulsions every day. Her family moved to Colorado, which voted to legalize marijuana in 2012, so that she could begin a daily regimen.

  • Lynn Johnson / National Geographic
    Phillip Hague, the chief horticulturist at a Denver cannabis company called Mindful, sniffs the roots of a plant to check on their health. He’s grown cannabis most of his life and has traveled the world researching its many varieties. He’s interested in developing new strains with higher concentrations of marijuana’s lesser known compounds that appear to have medical uses. “Cannabis speaks to me,” he says.

  • Lynn Johnson / National Geographic
    At Denver’s LivWell, which has an enormous indoor growing operation, workers remove marijuana leaves before the buds are trimmed, keeping the plants destined for medical use separate from those for recreational use. After Colorado legalized marijuana, thousands of young people from all over the world flocked to the state to participate in the multimillion-dollar business phenomenon that’s been called the Green Rush.

  • Lynn Johnson / National Geographic
    Kim Clark’s younger son, Caden, 11, suffers from severe epilepsy. Despite having brain surgery twice, he’d never had a seizure-free day until he started taking CBD oil.

  • National Geographic
 
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