MJ News for 06/03/2014

7greeneyes

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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/la-me-ln-san-jose-marijuana-voters-20140602,0,5846590.story




San Jose dispensaries offer free marijuana to card-carrying voters


Cannabis clubs in San Jose are offering free pot and discounts to patients who go to the polls Tuesday and vote in several contested races.

The Silicon Valley Cannabis Coalition is organizing the "Weed for Votes" program as an effort to increase voter turnout at Tuesday's election.

“We have a huge opportunity to make a large impact in who runs San Jose,” coalition director John Lee said in a statement. “Although we may not have regulations on the June ballot, insuring the right politicians are elected is even more important.”

Voters with medical marijuana cards who show their ballot stubs or an "I voted" sticker could received free cannabis and discounts at collectives throughout San Jose.

The group is asking voters with medical marijuana cards to cast ballots for candidates who will be "reasonable" with their regulations on cannabis clubs.

Local races include leadership positions on the San Jose City Council as well as a county and statewide election.

The free pot offer does not appear to violate California's vote-buying law, according to a statement from Santa Clara County Dist. Atty. Jeff Rosen.

But it may violate a federal voter-influence law because some candidates on the ballot are vying for federal offices, he said in a statement.

The group's "cannabis-friendly" election guide suggests voters cast a ballot for certain San Jose City Council candidates, as well as a superior court judge, local sheriff and state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris.

The free pot program comes as the San Jose City Council is expected to vote Tuesday on new medical marijuana regulations, including restrictions on medical marijuana cards and where cannabis is grown.

Collections would be required to be at least 1,000 feet away from schools, day-care centers, churches, parks and recreation centers; 500 feet away from substance abuse rehabilitation centers; and 150 feet away from homes.
 

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http://time.com/2817517/tobacco-companies-marijuana/




Big Tobacco Planned Big Marijuana Sales in the 1970s


Documents buried deep in tobacco company archives reveal a hope and a plan to sell marijuana as soon as legally possible

Tobacco executives anticipated the legalization of marijuana as early as the 1970′s — and they wanted a piece of the action, according to newly discovered documents from tobacco company archives.

Public health researchers scanned 80 million pages of digitized company documents for keywords such as, “marijuana,” “cannabis,” “reefer,” “weed,” “spliffs,” and “blunts.” The results, published Tuesday in the Milbank Quarterly, reveal a long history of maneuvers toward marijuana-laced products.

“The starting point must be to learn how to produce in quantity cigarettes loaded uniformly with a known amount of either ground cannabis or dried and cut cannabis rag,” read one memorandum from British American Tobacco’s adviser on technical research, Charles Ellis.

A hand-written letter from Philip Morris president George Weissman read, “While I am opposed to its use, I recognize that it may be legalized in the near future…Thus, with these great auspices, we should be in a position to examine: 1. A potential competition, 2. A possible product, 3. At this time, cooperate with the government.”

Philip Morris even went so far as to request a marijuana sample from the Department of Justice for research purposes, promising to share its findings with the government so long as the company’s involvement remained strictly confidential. “We request that there be no publicity whatsoever,” wrote a Philip Morris executive. The Justice Department drug science’s chief Milton Joffee obliged with a promise to deliver “good quality” marijuana.

While tobacco executives missed the mark on legalization by several decades, they did lay out a persuasive case for vigilance. In early 1970, an unsigned memorandum distributed to Philip Morris’ top management read, “We are in the business of relaxing people who are tense and providing a pick up for people who are bored or depressed. The human needs that our product fills will not go away. Thus, the only real threat to our business is that society will find other means of satisfying these needs.”

The study authors said the documents provide proof of tobacco companies’ intent to enter the marijuana trade, despite their claims to the contrary. They urged policymakers to prevent tobacco makers from entering the nascent market for legal marijuana “in a way that would replicate the smoking epidemic, which kills 480,000 Americans each year.”
 

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http://time.com/2814282/marijuana-sleep-deprivation/




Marijuana Use Can Bring Sleepless Nights, Study Finds


A wake up call from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania finds that a history of drug usage, even among quitters, may disrupt a good night's rest

A new study has found higher incidences of restlessness and sleep deprivation among marijuana users, upending conventional wisdom that it can help a user relax into a good night’s rest.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania surveyed the sleep habits of 1,811 former and current marijuana users. The users reported higher rates of sleeplessness and drowsiness compared with nonusers, and the most affected group were participants who started using the drug at an early age. Those who experimented with marijuana before the age of 15 were twice as likely to report severe sleep loss, even if they had cut back on the drug on later in life, a finding that surprised researchers.

“As more people have access [to marijuana], it will be important to understand the implications of marijuana use on public health, as its impact on sleep in the ‘real world’ is not well known,” said senior author Michael Grandner.
 

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http://www.delawareonline.com/story...elaware-decriminalize-marijuana-laws/9830693/




Should Delaware decriminalize its marijuana laws?


Should Delaware decriminalize smoking marijuana? A bill has been introduced into the General Assembly that would do just that. While we are at it, why not ask the follow-up question: Should Delaware just go ahead and legalize marijuana?

No doubt, the sponsors of the just-proposed bill will claim legalization is not the intent of their action. However, for many Delawareans, legalization is the next logical question. Therefore, why not discuss it now?

The proposed bill, House Bill 371, would only decriminalize personal use of marijuana. It would not "legalize" it. An individual could possess up to 28 grams of marijuana. The only prohibition on its use would be smoking it in public.

Backers of the bill and other advocates claim that the public is all for decriminalization. We should be careful about using any polling numbers for two reasons. The first is that the numbers readily available are being offered by advocates for changing the current laws. The second reason is that the debate has just started.

H.B. 371 is not expected to go far this late in the legislative session. Advocates likely will have to wait until next year, after the November election, to introduce it again. It will be interesting to hear would-be legislators holding forth on pot at candidate forums this fall. Since it is a public issue, all candidates should have to state their position on how they will vote.

On the surface, it makes sense that a majority of Delawareans would be in favor of decriminalizing marijuana. However, that support is likely just at the surface. It probably reflects public frustration with the status quo. Smoking marijuana can earn a smoker prison time and a $1,150 fine. That does not make sense.

While few people actually go to jail for a small amount of marijuana, possession can lead to other legal problems, such as add-on charges. H.B. 371 would make smoking marijuana in public a civic offense, not a criminal one. The fine would be $100.

The biggest problem with the bill for most people is that it goes against federal law. Right now, the Obama administration has a policy of ignoring federal marijuana law violations. Many people, however, want the nation to step back from an unsuccessful "war on drugs."

Decriminalization of marijuana is considered an easy and logical step. This is leading to reform led by the states. That could lead to the 50 states having 50 different types of laws – some easy, some tough. However, what happens if the next president is not as tolerant and wants to crack down on the states? We will have a long and noisy legal fight if that happens.

In the meantime, Delawareans should consider implications of the bill. Nothing the government does is without consequences. Some are intended. Some are not. It is those unintended consequences that we should be thinking about.
 

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http://www.syracuse.com/news/index....-based_medication_for_kids_suffering_sei.html




NY to hold clinical trials for marijuana-based medication for kids suffering seizures


ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) -- New York state is partnering with a British company to hold clinical trials for marijuana-based medication for children who have seizures that are resistant to their medicine.

An agreement was signed Sunday between Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration and GW Pharmaceuticals. The state Health Department and the company will develop the framework for a clinical trial for a marijuana-based drug for people under the age of 18.

It will involve Epidiolex, an investigational medication that uses cannabidiol, a marijuana extract that doesn't get users high. It could help children with rare forms of epilepsy such as Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes.

"Young New Yorkers battling these diseases deserve treatments that work for them, and by investigating the merits of cannabidiol we are pushing the boundaries of modern medicine and working to fundamentally improve the quality of life for those children," Cuomo said Tuesday.

Dravet syndrome is a rare genetic disorder typically untreatable by anti-epileptic drugs. It can be fatal. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, another rare form of childhood-onset epilepsy, is characterized by different types of seizures multiple times a day and cognitive dysfunction. To be eligible for the trial, the children would have to show signs that their current medication is not working.

The Health Department is working on the framework for the protocol, which needs to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration before it is enacted. A state official with knowledge of the agreement told The Associated Press on Monday they expect FDA approval relatively quickly. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak publicly about the agreement.

In Colorado, the Charlotte's Web strain of marijuana, which is high in cannabidiol content, has received international attention for its effect on children with severe seizures. It also is low in the chemical responsible for most of marijuana's psychological effects. The Realm of Caring, a nonprofit organization that produces the strain, currently has 206 people on its waiting list in the United States and separate waiting lists worldwide.

The announcement of the agreement with GW Pharmaceuticals comes as medical marijuana legislation is being pushed into the forefront of New York state politics.

In January, Cuomo, a Democrat, proposed a pilot program to allow 20 hospitals statewide to administer medical marijuana to seriously ill patients under the Health Department's guidelines.

And the Legislature is considering two medical marijuana bills. One called the Compassionate Care Act is making its way through the Republican-led Senate. It would allow patients with one of 20 serious illnesses to use the drug. The bill would bar anyone under the age of 21 from smoking marijuana but would allow the drug to be administered through a vaporizer, oil or something edible.

Another measure would prohibit smoking the drug in its entirety, but legalize medical marijuana use in vaporizer, oil or edible form for seriously ill patients.
 

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/02/marijuana-coffee-legal-adam-stites-_n_5431822.html




There's A Marijuana Coffee That Really Lets You 'Wake And Bake'


Your morning joe just got a little more Mary Jane.

Marijuana coffee is coming to the state of Washington, and the product is promising consumers a caffeinated buzz. The cold-brewed cannibis-infused coffee, called Legal, is expected to hit the market in early July, product developer Adam Stites told The Huffington Post on Monday.

"It’s an alert, creative high," he said.

Stites also calls it "the wake and bake drink," according to My Northwest.

He said each bottle contains about 20 milligrams of THC, the psychoactive compound that gives marijuana users a high. That's enough to make the experience similar to having "a nice IPA or glass of wine. We don't want to pack so much THC into every one of our drinks that it's unpleasant, especially for people that are just getting into marijuana," he told My Northwest.

The company Stites founded, Mirth Provisions, is a bit more flowery about the effects. In describing the version with cream and sugar, the website states: "Drinking this coffee is like riding a cool avalanche of pure deliciousness down a tall mountain and landing in an ocean of good feelings. You’ll swim off into a day of work or play filled to the brim with pure joy."

Mirth Provisions has also developed sparkling cherry, lemon ginger and pomegranate juices fortified with cannabis extract.

Recreational marijuana was legalized in Washington state in 2012, but retail sales have hit regulatory snags, according to the Washington Post.

Stites told HuffPost that an inspection by the state's department of agriculture is scheduled for June 12. He anticipates the retail operation to be up and running by early July. The 11.5-ounce bottles would probably retail between $9 and $11, he said.
 

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http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-other-cannabis-war-20140603




The Other Cannabis War
: The Battle Over Hemp


In the annals of strange bedfellow politics, the story of how, in 2014, industrial hemp emerged from Drug War purgatory is an epic one. But even for long-time hemp advocates, the sight of Rep. Thomas Massie, a conservative Republican from northern Kentucky, biting jubilantly into a hemp bar on live TV last month was startling.

The Great Marijuana Experiment: A Tale of Two Drug Wars

Buried in February’s $956 billion farm bill is an amendment, co-sponsored by Rep. Massie, that legally distinguishes industrial hemp from marijuana after decades of conflation. It defines hemp as an agricultural crop rather than a drug — and effectively frees American farmers to grow it for the first time in almost 60 years.

Widespread cultivation won't happen overnight - for one thing, the U.S. has no hemp seeds or hemp-processing facilities. But the sudden change in hemp's fortunes shocks its supporters. "If you'd asked me five years ago if I thought we could get Mitch McConnell to introduce a hemp bill, I'd have told you it was impossible," says Eric Steenstra, president of Vote Hemp, the advocacy group formed in 2000 to educate and lobby for hemp legalization in state legislatures and on the Hill. "This is huge."

It’s also been a long time coming. For 20 years, legislators, farmers, hippies, activists, agency heads and agronomists have worked to recast hemp as a game-changer, an American cash crop that could jump-start the country's next economic revival. Kentucky took the legislative lead with outright advocacy by its agriculture department. Unlike a high-profile 2007 lawsuit in which two North Dakota hemp farmers took on the DEA without support from their elected officials in Washington, Kentucky brought its entire federal (and much of its state) delegation to the party.

Among hemp’s biggest advocates are Kentucky’s Republican senator, Rand Paul, the avowed champion of limited government who tweets about the tragedy of the drug war, and James Comer, the state’s young Republican agriculture commissioner who successfully sued the DEA last month for seizing Kentucky’s imported hemp seeds and for interfering with the implementation of pilot programs made legal by the farm bill. And Massie, a fiscal hawk active in last year’s government shutdown who once studied robotics at MIT.

Colorado, Vermont and Kentucky wasted no time launching their industrial hemp research and the pilot programs provided for in the farm bill. In an obscure notice dated April 16th, the USDA alerted state and county officials that farmers in states that ok’d hemp production (15 so far) could now include hemp acreage in their crop reports. The floodgates have opened.

From California and representing the activist left: David Bronner, president of his family's Magic Soap empire. Bronner has thrown the weight of probably the most iconic hippie brand in the world behind hemp legalization and GMO-labeling initiatives. In 2012, Bronner locked himself in a cage with a thatch of hemp plants in clear view of the White House; he was preparing a hemp oil sandwich when he was sawed out of his prison by the D.C. fire department and hauled away by police.

Explaining industrial hemp has taken decades. A lot of people don’t know what it is and many think it’s pot. "It’s just been incredibly frustrating for the hemp industry that hemp has been lumped legally and in public perception with marijuana," Bronner tells Rolling Stone.

Hemp isn't weed and hemp can’t get you high—it's a bust as a recreational drug. Hemp is marijuana's non-psychoactive sibling, derived, like weed, from the cannabis sativa plant. The current American hemp market is estimated at nearly half a billion dollars, with hemp’s oil, seed and fiber used in food, carbon-negative building materials, and automobile composites that are already inside millions of cars. Hemp cultivation is also as old as the country itself. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew it, hemp was once legal tender, and several drafts of the Declaration of Independence were written on hemp paper. During WWII, American farmers were paid to grow it, cultivating more than 150 million pounds of industrial hemp to support the American war effort. The U.S. government's 1942 propaganda film, Hemp for Victory, depicts workers toiling happily to harvest lush fields of hemp; the fibrous plants to be later converted to materiel like rope and parachute webbing for the military.

Despite its patriotic bona fides, cannabis sativa was a victim of reefer madness in almost every decade of the 20th Century. Praised, taxed, vilified, confused with pot and blamed for killing sprees and the theft of American jobs by immigrants. The final nail in hemp's coffin was its classification as a Schedule 1 narcotic in 1970's Controlled Substances Act.

The U.S. is the only industrialized nation without a commercial hemp industry. All the hemp sold in the U.S., including the food and body products lining the shelves of Costco, the Body Shop and Whole Foods is imported. As Americans buy hemp, Britain, China, France and Germany are among the countries benefiting from America’s incoherent drug policy. Last year, Canadian farmers grew 67,000 acres of hemp and say they may not be able to grow enough to fill this year's orders. David Bronner began adding hemp oil — imported from Canada — to his liquid soaps in 1999. "I thought this was the most ridiculous piece of the drug war," he says "that a non-drug agricultural crop was caught up here."

Even as hemp fought to differentiate itself from pot, it undeniably benefited from its association with it, successfully riding the wave of marijuana legalization in states throughout the country. And as hemp lobbyists worked to change cannabis laws, high-profile court cases highlighted the confusing and capricious application of federal drug laws to the non-drug plant.

In 2001, in a fit of drug war paranoia, the DEA declared a ban on foods that contain hemp including certain cereals, salad dressings, breads and veggie burgers—claiming that the foods contained THC. Effected businesses were given 120 days to dump their inventories. With the hemp food market just taking off, 200 hemp companies, including Dr. Bronner's Magic Soap, took the DEA to court. The lawsuit allowed the hemp industry to make its case in the media. Hemp won the bruising battle nearly three years later when a federal judge in San Francisco ruled that the government couldn't regulate the trace amounts of THC that occur naturally in hemp seeds.

When the first hemp bill was introduced in Congress in 2005, it was lonely business. "At that point we had Ron Paul, a pariah in the Republican Party, recalls Steenstra. “Nobody wanted to do anything with us and we could barely get co-sponsors. We'd say hemp and they’d say 'no, no, no, that's pot.' We banged on a lot of doors and worked in state legislatures to get laws changed there. A lot of states considered marijuana to be all cannabis and they didn’t distinguish. We knew we had to change minds in both places." It wasn't until 2012 that the first hemp bill was introduced in the Senate, when Oregon’s liberal senator, Ron Wyden, took to the floor to call federal hemp prohibition "the poster child for dumb regulation."

City of Denver Urges Symphony to Cancel Marijuana Concerts

What worked was the lure of jobs and economic development. When Comer, a family farmer who served six terms in the Kentucky state legislature, ran for agriculture commissioner in 2011, campaigning on industrial hemp was a no-brainer. Kentucky was once the heartland of hemp production in the U.S. and people came out of the woodwork to talk to Comer about it. "And it was all over the spectrum," Comer tells Rolling Stone. "Liberals liked it because they were environmentalists and conservatives in the Tea Party liked it because it was an example of government overreach. Older voters were overwhelmingly for hemp because they remembered when their families grew it. They didn't know you could make automobile parts from it because at the time, all you made with hemp in Kentucky was rope."

Comer is credited with extraordinary consensus building in a state known for legislative gridlock and political enmity. Early last year, the Kentucky legislature passed Senate Bill 50 over the objections of the state police commissioner who insisted that state police conducting pot eradication programs couldn't tell the difference between hemp and marijuana.

On Capitol Hill last Thursday, Rep. Massie and Rep. Suzanne Bonamici (D-Ore.) each introduced amendments that would prevent the DEA and Justice Dept. from spending any money to interfere with states who are implementing their hemp laws. In the last 50 years there has only been one hemp vote in the House and that was last year. Suddenly there’ve been two more.

Without seeds, how long will it take to make hemp just another American crop like soybeans? "There’s definitely a process we have to get through," says Bronner. "We’ve given the Canadians and the Europeans and the Chinese a huge head start on the modern global awareness of hemp. They’ve had years of breeding programs to optimize their cultivars for their climate conditions and we’ve been doing nothing."

Canadian agronomist Anndrea Hermann says finding the right hemp varieties for the U.S. is crucial. "I would never tell a farmer anywhere, 'let's start mass cultivation next year,’" Hermann tells Rolling Stone. Hermann lives in a country with a fully-regulated hemp industry. "And we have to have the farmers’ voice. If we don't have farmers, we don’t have agriculture."

In Kentucky, farming programs for veterans that teach families how to grow their own food have just sewn hemp in collaboration with the agriculture department and Vote Hemp. Mike Lewis, a military veteran and food security expert who founded the group in 2012 when his brother returned from the war in Afghanistan with a brain injury, now has grant money for a hemp textile project and part-time work for twelve people. This in a state with a 19% poverty rate. "Appalachia has a strong history of textiles," Lewis observes. "In my vision that's what's missing from rural communities, ag income. People used to survive off tobacco. If it has to be hemp for textiles, let's do it. People call hemp a panacea, a pipe dream, but look how many people came together from all walks of life in Kentucky to make this happen."

Rand Paul’s father — who got on the hemp bandwagon on a dare from Ralph Nader — saw it coming. "I use [hemp's illegality] quite frequently as an example of government stupidity," Ron Paul told Mother Jones in 2011. "And I am sure I get credibility for this, especially with the young people, because that's where I get my strongest support. If you are concerned about the economy, then why are we doing these dumb things?”
 

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/karstenstrauss/2014/06/02/cannabis-coworking-space-for-green-startups/




Cannabis Coworking Space For 'Green' Startups


The trend toward coworking space and virtual offices has risen in tandem with the growth of startup culture. Sometimes these office enclaves specialize in certain industries. One of the more unique such spots is the newly opened Green Labs in Denver, a place for entrepreneurs in the cannabis culture to launch their enterprises.

The idea is only six months old but in that time founders Dave Pike and Michael Looney have secured a 3,100 square foot loft in the River North Art district of the Colorado capital—a formerly industrial neighborhood that’s reinvented itself as a place for art, young companies and places to unwind.

Looney, who started Alt-Space in Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood last year, and Pike began contemplating an expansion of coworking facilities into another city and decided that the newly relaxed outlook on cannabis in certain parts of the country might provide opportunity. “It seemed liked there were going to be a lot of companies rushing to this industry but not a lot of consolidation and not a lot of collaborative work environments,” Looney said.

Don’t get him wrong—cannabis entrepreneurs get together for events and gatherings all the time. Working together, he says, is something that needs to develop.

The facility has three startups that have signed on to take space so far: a cannabis-oriented radio show, a company that builds grow-rooms and a CRM firm. Since word has spread about Green Labs Denver, many hopeful entrepreneurs have called to place their names on the list. Looney and Pike expect to be 75% full within the next three weeks.

Make no mistake, Pike and Looney’s new digs are not a place to toke up. It’s a coworking space like any other and offers wifi, a coffee station, two private offices and 40 desks, plus a back yard. “We built out conference rooms, desks, we put in a bar—and all the amenities,” Looney explained. Costwise, companies will pay $449 a month for a reserved desk, $249 for a regular desk, and virtual office space (mailing address and mail forwarding services) costs $49.

The founders are in talks to secure some space next door for gatherings and parties, seeking to impart a new spin on the local cannabis and business culture, as well as attract the interest of sophisticated investors, lawyers and entrepreneurs looking to work or partner with cannabis-oriented startups.

As far as expansion is concerned, Green Labs is relegated to going wherever lawmakers see fit to ease anti-cannabis laws, or in places where there is a strong cannabis culture. That could mean Alaska, California, Oregon, New York and Washington are penciled in on the drawing board.
 

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http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/po...-opposition-chief-sings-praises-cannabis-tea/




Bermuda opposition chief sings praises of cannabis tea


Bermuda opposition leader Marc Bean has come under fire from a leading children's rights advocate after admitting he gave his then-3-year-old daughter cannabis tea to treat her asthma.

"It sort of takes my breath away," Sheelagh Cooper, head of the Coalition for the Protection of Children, said Monday. "Assuming that the active ingredients of cannabis are in this tea, that is not only illegal in Bermuda but, to my standpoint, it's very questionable as to any medical benefit for a child."

Speaking in the House of Assembly about the Cannabis Reform Collaborative's report on potential changes to Bermudan laws and policy toward marijuana, Bean said he had used pot medicinally for both himself and his family.

He called for legalization of marijuana with "light touch" regulation, saying that taxation of cannabis could bring in more than $20 million.

Kicking off the marathon debate, Premier Michael Dunkley said the One Bermuda Alliance government has no plans to legalize marijuana.

"It is wrong to yield to a more permissive attitude socially without due regard to the social, economic and health consequences," he said.

Bean, however, said his personal experience had convinced him of the health benefits of cannabis.

"When my daughter was 3 years old, because of the circumstances I didn't have much opportunity to spend time with her up until she reached about 2 1/2, 3, but I always was told she suffers from asthma," the opposition leader recounted.

"The first opportunity I had my daughter, who's now going on 20 years old, the first opportunity I had her in my care and custody I went and made her a big cup of ganja (marijuana) tea. That was when she was 2 1/2, 3 years old."

"Now some of you might be saying 'that's irresponsible as a parent', but you can go ask her mother and her family on her mother's side today. Since that day she has never, ever suffered from asthma. Since that one day, that one cup of cannabis tea," Bean said.

Ganja tea also cured his septuagenarian father's insomnia, he insisted.

The same debate included a disclosure by former Health Minister Patricia Gordon-Pamplin that she authorized the importation of cannabinoid oil last year for a cancer patient after an appeal from his family.

"There were hoops and bells and whistles that had to be overcome in order to make that decision, and while the legislation says 'no, this is illegal, it cannot be imported,' I looked at it from a perspective that if there was any way that there was a possibility to allow this individual to have the cannabinoid oil that was going to give him comfort, there's no way, as the Minister of Health, I was going to block it," she said.

Gordon-Pamplin, who is now Works Minister, said the since-deceased patient eventually received the oil and that she was grateful he could enjoy a modicum of comfort in his final days.
 

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