Mj news for 06/05/2015

7greeneyes

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http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_28252221/colorado-offer-one-day-tax-holiday-marijuana





Colorado to offer one-day tax holiday on marijuana





Colorado will repeal sales taxes on marijuana Sept. 16, thanks to a quirk in its constitution.

The one-time-only holiday from the 10 percent state sales tax on recreational pot is likely to generate buzz in the first state in the nation to legalize marijuana.

The little-noticed provision is part of a larger bill that Gov. John Hickenlooper signed into law Thursday that includes a ballot initiative in November and a permanent tax cut on recreational pot sales in 2017.

"This fiscal glitch that we have with the constitution ... that's part of the magic of living in Colorado," the Democratic governor said.

The impetus is the Taxpayer's Bill of Rights, a measure championed by conservatives. The constitutional provision requires voters to approve new taxes based on estimates of collections and state spending. If the actual amount exceeds the estimates, refunds are necessary.

Colorado isn't collecting more pot taxes than expected — actually, the amount is far less than projections — but total state spending exceeded initial estimates because of the improving economy.

"This is only a first-year problem," said Sen. Pat Steadman, D-Denver, who authored House Bill 1367. "We'll never have this problem again."

When triggered, TABOR also requires the tax rate to be cut to zero. State lawmakers agreed to eliminate the sales tax for one day to meet the constitutional obligations and then restore it. The tax holiday is expected to cost the state about $100,000 in revenue. The bigger price tag — $3.6 million — is what the state anticipates losing in revenue for a one-day elimination of the 15 percent excise tax on marijuana sales from cultivators to retailers.

A permanent sales-tax break on recreational marijuana takes effect July 2017, lowering the rate from 10 percent to 8 percent.

"We still have a black market, and we want to moderate our taxes to make sure that the risk of someone selling illegally. ... We want to eliminate that," Hickenlooper said. "And one way is to make sure there is not as large a price differential."

The focus of the bill, however, is the ballot question this fall. The state will ask voters' permission to keep the estimated $58 million in pot taxes collected this fiscal year.

"This is one of those cases that we have to go back to voters and ask them if we can keep the money they already asked us to collect," Hickenlooper said.

Mike Elliott, the executive director of the Marijuana Industry Group, a leading advocate, said in a recent interview that his group has not yet decided whether to take a stance on the ballot measure.

Unlike the initial ballot measures that legalized marijuana in Colorado, this November's referendum isn't expected to generate much attention. The governor said he would spread the word as he travels the state for town hall forums this fall and will rely on state lawmakers to help push the message.

The question is designed to give voters a stark choice about the money. If they agree to let the state spend it, the first $40 million will go toward school construction. The remainder is apportioned to a variety of marijuana programs for youth mentoring, agriculture, drug treatment and enforcement.

If voters reject the measure, the state will refund the bulk of the money — $33 million — to marijuana growers and users through tax breaks on production and sales. The remaining $25 million will go to all Colorado taxpayers through a sales tax refund.

The state already is planning a $70 million TABOR refund at next year's tax filing, but it is separate from the marijuana tax rebate.

"We constructed this in such a way so voters will understand what happens when they vote yes and what happens when they vote no," Steadman said. "The consequences of your yes or no vote are really clear."

The Sept. 16 date was selected for the tax holiday because the end-of-the-year fiscal report is certified the previous day.

The date is also Mexican Independence Day, which marks the start of the country's war against the Spanish colonial government. The word "marijuana" is considered offensive and racist to some Mexicans.
 

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/05/marijuana-parasites-deworming_n_7497222.html






New Look At Pot-Smoking Pygmies Suggests Marijuana Helps Deter Parasites






The Aka pygmies of Africa's Congo basin are known to smoke a lot of pot, and a new study suggests there may be a big benefit to all that toking, at least for the men: those who smoked the most marijuana were significantly less likely to be heavily infected with parasitic worms.

Taste for drugs. The researchers behind the study believe the finding helps explain why humans have a taste for all sorts of drugs. Previous research conducted by the team found that Aka who smoked more tobacco also had fewer parasites.

"The gist is that most popular drugs, including nicotine, THC [tetrahydrocannabinol, pot's main psychoactive component], cocaine, caffeine, and opium, are plant neurotoxins that evolved to deter, not reward, plant consumption. So why do humans everywhere enthusiastically consume such plant neurotoxins?" Dr. Edward Hagen, an anthropologist at Washington State University in Vancouver, told The Huffington Post in an email. "Non-human animals often consume plant toxins to kill their own parasites, and we thought maybe humans might be doing the same thing."

For the study, Hagen and his colleagues surveyed more than 370 men and women living along the Lobaye River in the Central African Republic. They found that 70 percent of the men reported smoking marijuana. Only 6 percent of women did -- which the researchers attribute to the fact that in the absence of modern birth control, most women between the ages of 18 and 40 are pregnant or nursing.

Urine samples taken from the men confirmed that 68 percent of them had smoked recently.

Worm burden. When the researchers took stool samples from the men to assess their "worm burden," they found that 95 percent of them were infected with parasites. High concentrations of THCA -- a byproduct of THC in the urine -- were associated with a low number of worms.

Still, it's not entirely clear that pot is what kept the heavy smokers' parasites in check. Previous studies showed that marijuana does kill worms in petri dishes, but according to Hagen that doesn't necessarily mean pot has the same effect in humans.

"We have one study in one population," he said in the email. "Many more studies are needed to confirm that cannabis actually does reduce worm infections in a live human being."

Closer look at the link. The researchers are calling for more research into the link between THC and the immune system.

The study was published online on May 29, 2015 in the American Journal of Human Biology.
 

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/debrabo...uana-applications-for-new-york-are-due-today/






Medical Marijuana Applications For New York Are Due Today





Today is the last day for medical marijuana applicants to send in their paperwork in the state of New York. The New York Post claimed that the state had received over 300 applications. The state would not confirm that amount and would only say that the approved licenses would be announced in mid July. The program is supposed to be up and running by January 2016. However, that doesn’t give the approved producers much time and many agreed that the timetable was close to impossible to meet. Some applicants have already begun securing real estate locations in the event that they get approved. The dispensaries also have to produce their own product and now parcels of land in upstate New York are being listed as great places to grow marijuana.

Some companies aren’t waiting for their approvals. Empire State Compassionate Care, which is owned and run by the principals of New Jersey’s Garden State Dispensary announced today the locations of their New York dispensaries. David Weisser said, “We’re excited to put in an application with locked-in dispensary and manufacturing locations.” The locations include 40 West 27th Street in Manhattan, 760 Fulton Ave in Hempstead in Nassau County, 3057 Erie Boulevard East in Syracuse and 1933 Kensington Ave. in Cheektowga, a suburb of Buffalo.

Last night politicians gathered at an event called Reform NY in a very zen space at ABC Carpet & Home in Manhattan. The room lined with art work by Thich Nhat Hanh, a Vietnamese Zen Buddhist monk was filled with a combination of activists and marijuana industry professionals.

The overarching theme at the event from the politicians is that marijuana arrests disproportionately hurt their African-Americans and Hispanic constituents more than their Caucasian citizens. New York State Senator Liz Krueger whose district 28 covers the mostly wealthy east side of Manhattan said, “The kids in my district are using marijuana at exactly the same statistical rates as everywhere else in the city of New York, if not more because they have more disposable cash. Nobody gets busted in my district for marijuana. Nobody even worries about and yet we see as many as 50,000 Black/Latino kids in the city having to face a radically changed life because of the same activity.”

The Drug Policy Alliance, which organized the event, noted that New York spends $675 million a year enforcing marijuana possession laws. Nearly 85% of those arrested for marijuana possession in New York are Black and Latino even though young white men are more likely to be the users. More striking is that as the country has gotten more comfortable with the legalization of marijuana, New York has gotten stricter. In 1990, there were only 892 arrest for marijuana, and last year there were 26,386 arrests, a nearly 2,900% increase.

New York State Assembly leader Richard Gottfried acknowledged that the state’s medical marijuana law and regulations weren’t great, but that they had no choice. Gottfried said, “Last June, we were about to pass in both houses and the Governor calls me and Diane Savino down to his office and says ‘This is how we’ve got to change it.’ Maybe we should have called him to stuff it and pass it how it was and had him veto it, but we decided to bargain with him. We got a lot of really bad changes into the legislation and when they came out with the regulations they were even worse.”

Some of the mothers of sick children that attended the event spoke about how the restrictions would affect them. Since only 20 locations will be approved, one mother said it could potentially take her an hour to reach a dispensary and she would also need to file paperwork in order to accompany her child inside. With only five strains approved for each producer, its also possible that she won’t be able to get the best possible medicine for her child. Another mother complained that there were no emergency provisions written into the legislation, so now she continues to wait for treatment. Her son is so ill he doesn’t get approved for drug trials because the drug companies fear he’ll skew the results. Other states that have legalized medical marijuana have provided for emergency measures.

The general feeling from the event was that the law isn’t great, but it’s at least a starting point. Many believe the approved illness list will expand and the number of providers will be increased. There is also an expectation that laws could change on the federal level and that will force New York to ease it’s restrictive policies.
 

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http://www.amny.com/news/medical-ma...oklyn-palliatech-inc-leasing-space-1.10508827





Company leasing space for medical marijuana dispensary in Downtown Brooklyn






A Long Island company vying for a state license to distribute medical marijuana has leased space in Downtown Brooklyn, Crain's first reported Thursday.

PalliaTech Inc., a producer of marijuana-based pain medications, is looking to move into the second floor of 425 Fulton St., between Pearl and Jay Streets, where it will take up 3,000 square feet of space.

"You want to be in a population center and you want access to public transportation and it's a great location from that perspective," said Andrei Bogolubov, executive vice president of PalliaTech. "The state has placed a high priority on geographic dispersion of the dispensaries and where the medicine will be manufactured and you have Brooklyn, where we were able to find a terrific facility there."

At the moment, only five licenses will be awarded and the application process is an arduous one.

Companies vying for one of the coveted spots had to submit dozens of pages on business summaries, construction timelines, energy sources and up-to-date building codes, among other specifications by Friday's deadline. Each company that is granted a license by the New York State Department of Health will be permitted to open four locations.

"It is going to be very competitive and we can't go into it with confidence but we can go in with optimism, said Bogolubov. "We are hopeful that we will be well received and that the state will have a decision in July. They have a lot of material to review and the state has been really determined with meeting the deadlines because they want to be servicing patients in January 2016. Many operators will not be able to hit that target but we think we can."

Hours before the announcement Thursday, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams coincidentally said he wanted a dispensary in Kings County.

"I want Airbnb. I want Bitcoin. I want a marijuana dispensary. Come to Brooklyn," Adams said during a speech about real estate at the Harvard Club.
Palliatech is also leasing three other spots upstate.

The dispensary would have the look of a modern pharmacy, but walk-ins will not be allowed. Patients with prescriptions will also have access to pharmacists and counselors.

Robert Perris, district manager for Community Board 2, which covers the area, didn't have an issue with the dispensary opening there.

"We have no formal role in approving the location, but the discussion would be more out of a popular interest thank any administrative role that we would play," Perris said. "One advantage to this particular location is that it is in an area that in addition to a local police precinct, there is an excellent security force in play."

In July, 2014, New York became the 23rd state to legalize medical marijuana by enacting the Compassionate Care Act. Although Gov. Andrew Cuomo had been fiercely opposed to medical marijuana legalization previously, he worked with the State Legislature to create the law that will give relief to thousands of New Yorkers.

PalliaTech donated $10,000 to Cuomo's campaign in 2014 according to state records. According to Forbes, by Jan. 23 Palliatech had raised $10 million in funding.

Gabriel Sayegh, managing director for policy and campaign for the Drug Policy Alliance, said there is concern in the community as to whether the deadlines are realistic and if companies will be able to serve the needs of patients with debilitating conditions.

"I think anyone who assumes that it's just going to happen should be careful because of a lot of the assumptions that folks have brought to this process," Sayegh said. "If they are able to open in Downtown Brooklyn and provide effective medication to patients, that would be great, but it's hard to imagine having a system in place. It starts opening up the question of where will those be, will some boroughs not have them, what about the rest of the city, those are the types of questions we have and the Department of Health has not answered."

The state Department of Health would oversee the process and distribution, making sure that the marijuana is supplied in a purified form in the way of pills, oils and vaporizers only.

The department also has the authority together with law enforcement agencies to shut down the program if they feel it has gotten out of control and the drug is used for illegal purposes. The law also has a sunset clause -- it is set to expire in seven years even if the program is successful, unless the state legislature renews it.

Still, area residents and workers see the dispensary as a positive step.

"It's a good thing! Why not?" said Maria Shteysel, a personal injury lawyer who practices at 585 Fulton St. "The neighborhood is definitely getting better - more and more Manhattan-like."
 

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/kimberl...e-and-legal-cannabis-movements-come-together/





In The Bay Area, The Farm-To-Table And Legal Cannabis Movements Come Together





Transparency is a prominent force in today’s food industry. While farmers markets are hardly new, the attachment to organic, locally grown products have surfaced in other industries throughout San Francisco and Oakland–namely marijuana. These pot-friendly cities have seen a rise in cannabis delivery systems and sampling parties. In late February Flow Kana, “the world’s first farm-to-table cannabis delivery platform,” launched in San Francisco, foreshadowing the next generation of a once taboo trade. By the end of June the company will also serve Oakland and Berkeley.

Drawing inspiration from the farmer’s market model, Flow Kana partners with organic, sun-grown cannabis growers. Their platform enables users with medical marijuana cards to select desired strains and have 1/8 oz. of “connoisseur grade” marijuana delivered within thirty minutes for approximately $50. This model not only eliminates middlemen dispensaries, but also flips the economics of the industry. Farmers that were once at the mercy of dispensary rates can engage in a direct-trade business model similar to that of the direct-trade coffee movement.

Michael Steinmetz and Nick Smilgys, founders of Flow Kana, have received $500,000 in seed funding for the company. The two aim to change the cannabis industry by increasing the connection and transparency between farmers and consumers. Much of this revolves around what Steinmetz and Smilgys deem the “clean cannabis movement.”

“The biggest problem besides the environmental factors [of indoor cultivation] is we have no idea what’s going into the cannabis–what types of products, chemicals, pesticides they’re putting into the plant,” says Steinmetz.

Unbeknownst to most, indoor cannabis production uses more than $6 billion in electricity annually. The industry as a whole is responsible for as much greenhouse gas emissions as 3 million cars, according to an independent study by Evan Mills, PhD of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. More specifically, 1lb. of indoor marijuana releases 4,600 lbs. of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

In regards to toxicity, there is no list of banned pesticides. Consequently, many medical marijuana users may be inhaling undesirable chemicals. For instance, in 2009 the pesticide, bifenthrin, was tested at 1,600 times the legal, digestible limit in 1 of 3 samples from Los Angeles dispensaries, according to The Journal of Toxicology.

“I think from a consumers perspective finding out who grew your cannabis, where they grew it, and how they grew it are essential first steps for creating a legal, transparent, legitimate model,” says Steinmetz.

Beyond its promotion of organic, outdoor cultivation, the company has encouraged cannabis farmers to come out of hiding. By partnering with the Emerald Growers Association (EGA), an organization that represents 300 independent marijuana farmers in Northern California, Flow Kana has created a medium for cultivators to be seen. Casey O’Neil and Amber Cline of Happydays Farms in Mendocino County were the first farmers to partner with the company. App users can directly connect with the pair via e-mail and social media.

Flow Kana has also stocked its board with local, industry leaders, bridging the gap between marijuana consumers, growers, and policy initiators. Amanda Reiman of Oakland is one of the company’s advisors, as well as the manager of marijuana law and policy for Drug Policy Alliance. The Oakland-based non-profit works to improve drug policies with a focus on marijuana law reform, harm reduction-based policies, and the diminution of mass incarceration–an effort Reiman believes Flow Kana can help facilitate.

“There has been little attention paid by licensing bodies to the men and women cultivating the marijuana that goes to help so many patients in California,” says Reiman. “Flow Kana recognizes the value of the California cannabis farmer and is the first to give them a platform to emerge as individuals and not faceless figures bringing marijuana in through the back door of a dispensary.”

Steinmetz, Smilgys, and their team hope the clean cannabis movement will legitimize marijuana farming in the eyes of both the public and the government. The Emerald Growers Association is currently advocating for legislation in Sacramento that would deem marijuana a crop in the eyes of California’s government. This would pave a path for business licenses and regulations that help family farms stay in the market, while adhering to specific standards.

“We’re responsible farmers and the lack of regulation has left us in a position where farmers and criminals are treated the same,” says Hezekiah Allen, chair and executive director of EGA. “That’s the single biggest thing we’re trying to correct.”

Allen is currently tracking 10 different, medical marijuana regulatory bills in Sacramento and working on cannabis legalization for the 2016 ballot. The former, Humboldt County cannabis farmer hopes to see regulations that keep marijuana cultivation decentralized. He believes limiting production amounts keep small, heritage farmers like O’Neil and Cline in the marketplace. Conversely, lack of regulation could encourage consolidation and an increase in large, industrial-sized farms.

“Over the last few centuries farmers have been pushed off the land. We’ve seen bigger and bigger farms. We see bigger consolidation, more toxic chemicals, and some of the most destructive environmental practices possible are commonplace in big agricultural businesses. We haven’t seen that with cannabis, because of prohibition,” says Allen.

Since launching in late February, Flow Kana has branded itself with a high quality, community-focused feel. Its lavish Berkeley Hills launch party was followed up with marijuana-sampling events, where Bay Area residents with medical cannabis cards learn to identify high-grade cannabis with Emerald Cup judges and farmers, Nikki Lastreto and Swami Chaitanya. Flow Kana’s next community event is set for June 11th.

The company currently serves San Francisco and will expand in Oakland and Berkeley by the end of June. Quickly thereafter, it plans to deploy the platform to the rest of the Bay Area and to all major, California cities by the end of 2015.

“As a 13 year resident of Oakland, I am so pleased to see the resurgence of community farming, organic, produce-based restaurants and a mindfulness of where food comes from and how it impacts the environment,” says Reiman. “Flow Kana fits perfectly in this picture as Oakland has a history of embracing cutting edge social entrepreneurship.”

While the future of the marijuana industry remains unclear, Flow Kana’s farm-to-table platform has ignited a culture of conscious cannabis throughout the Bay Area–something California may see much more of in months to come.
 

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https://munchies.vice.com/articles/this-cannabis-supper-club-wants-you-to-roll-rice-paper-joints






This Cannabis Supper Club Wants You to Roll Rice Paper Joints





In the week when the UK government announced plans to ban poppers and laughing gas, a weed supperclub was announced in London.

Was this to incite people to spark up and to to make a stand against draconian laws for minor drug use via the popular food scene? Well, no, actually. It’s just a chance to create interesting dishes themed around the notion of getting stoned.

“We’re not trying to make a statement but personally, I think coming from a country whose alcohol consumption is well documented, it’s all about having a bit of perspective and being open minded to other forms of relaxation,” explains Matt Klose, the chef behind Cannibistro. “It’s meant to be really nostalgic and looking at the ritual of getting high and looking at the cliches, so it’s a bit of fun really.”

Not that anyone will actually be getting blazed at this two-night, pop-up dinner. Instead, the menu is a four-course supper focusing on hemp: that small, nutty-flavoured seed Whole Food enthusiasts just won’t shut up about.

Despite coming from the cannabis plant, the reason you won’t get a buzz from eating hemp is because it contains none of the psychoactive substance, THC, found in varying abundance in female marijuana plants. It’s currently a hyped super-food, thanks to its high count of easily digestible protein (a 30 gram serving contains 10.5 grams), amino acids, and a ****-ton of Omega 3.

“Hemp has so many health benefits,” says Klose. “It’s so good for us and is really underused, which is also one of the main reasons we’re featuring it so heavily on the menu.”

Klose has split the menu into two halves: the “ceremony” and the “munchies.” To start is hemp “weed” tea, with the leaves brewed with bone broth and served via teapot into individual bowls of oxtail ravioli and herbs. Following that is the fittingly stoner dude-named “Roll Your Own Joint… jk, Not Really.” Diners can play with the act of “skinning up,” with Rizla-like rice paper sprinkled with strands of samphire, cubes of cured mackerel, and hemp seeds.

Then, it’s on to the munchies section of the evening: big sharing plates of kebabs that Klose describes as “beautiful smoked hogget, flatbread, and pickled red cabbage and lots of spice, dukka, and hemp seeds.” There’s also a re-imagining of a Snickers bar, with dark chocolate mousse, peanut, and (of course) hemp seed brittle and salted caramel. It all sounds pretty good, whether you’re baked or not.

Meanwhile, over in California, supperclubs are realising that with laws relaxed on marijuana use for “medical” reasons, there’s no need to leave the THC out of dinner. The Luck Pot collective in San Francisco hosts dinner parties with renowned local chefs including Robin Song from Hog & Rocks, who created a bespoke menu.

The group even employs a weed sommelier to pair each dish with the perfect strain of smoke. If you’re a medical card-carrying gourmand (and all cards are checked on entry to the secret supperclub) then congratulations, you’re about to take fine dining to a new high.

“Just as with wine, there are myriad components to take into consideration when it comes to pairing cannabis with cuisine, like acidness versus richness,” explains Tanner Wyer, a founding partner of All Things Good who produce The Luck Pot. “It’s important to take in all of the elements of the cannabis as it relates to what is being plated. For a true pairing experience, one thing we highly recommend is the ‘dry hit’. Taking a cannabis joint and pulling a dry hit—non lit—so that you can really appreciate and taste the varietals in the flower and how that might pair with certain foods.”

The fact that San Francisco considers itself such a “foodie” city is one of the reasons Wyer and friends decided to start dinner parties matching smoking with food.

“The city has such a rich history and world-wide renowned as an international hub for food, cannabis, and culture. The idea sprung from years of experience traveling across the country and around the world,” he says. “We immediately noticed a huge market that was being grossly underserved.”

Back in the UK, and although Cannibistro’s diners can’t actually enjoy the real deal at their dinner, Wyer approved of the supper menu.

“This sounds ******* amazing!” he says.

It seems to be the response Klose is going for—with or without a side of puff.
 

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http://blog.sfgate.com/smellthetrut...ifornia-medical-cannabis-regulations-advance/





Historic California medical cannabis regulations advance






California lawmakers have reached a historic compromise on regulating the world’s largest medical pot economy — paving the way for recreational legalization in 2016.

Yesterday, a sweeping bill to regulate California medical marijuana passed the California Assembly with a resounding, bipartisan 60-8 vote.

Assembly Bill 266 was crafted by police, merged with an industry-backed bill, and ultimately earned bipartisan support of lawmakers and the endorsement of the Emerald Grower’s Association, Americans for Safe Access and other industry groups.

According to an Assembly analysis, AB 266 spreads regulatory authority around the capitol, establishing a licensing and regulatory framework for medical cannabis under a new “Office of Marijuana Regulation” within the Office of the Governor, with a new Division of Medical Cannabis Regulation within the State Board of Equalization, a Division of Medical Cannabis Manufacturing and Testing within the California Department of Public Health, and a Division of Medical Cannabis Cultivation within the California Department of Food and Agriculture. Each would set forth the duties of the respective regulatory authorities.

AB 266 is joint authored by Assemblymembers Rob Bonta (D-Oakland), Ken Cooley (D-Rancho Cordova), and Reginald Byron Jones-Sawyer (D-Los Angeles).

It’s a historic breakthrough, 19 years after Californians legalized medical cannabis and called for statewide rules on its growth and sales.

“Today demonstrates how far the Legislature has come on the issue of medical cannabis; AB 266 truly represents an innovative, thoughtful, and much-needed approach to protect our patients and local businesses by creating a robust regulatory framework for this field,” stated Assemblymember Bonta.

Assemblymember Jones-Sawyer, stated, “In 1996, California became the first state in the nation to allow the use of medical cannabis after voters approved Proposition 215. This unprecedented collaborative effort will finally, after 19 years, regulate the medical marijuana industry. AB 266 creates a regulatory system that respects the interests of local government while still providing a consistent statewide structure.”

The bill now heads to the Senate.
 

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Hope all is well 7g.........
:48:



I'm doing really well right now. Trying to get my potassium down, it's too high so I have to cut out potassium-heavy foods.


My dialysis fistula has healed up nicely and in a few weeks will be capable of sustaining dialysis if my function dips lower then it is now (~15% gfr/function)

I'm nervous about dialysis, but I have to do what I have to do to live. I HATE needles and unfortunately that's what dialysis is all about.


Oh and this is the first year I have went OD with my grow, now that I'm a legal medical grower :) I have three monster females outside. It's going to be fun to try this new kind of growing.

:peace: Brother.
 

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