MJ News for 07/23/2014

7greeneyes

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/22/oregon-marijuana-legalization_n_5610770.html




Oregon Will Vote On Legalizing Recreational Marijuana In 2014


This November, Oregon voters will get to decide whether they want to legalize and regulate recreational marijuana.

"Initiative Petition 53 has qualified for the November ballot," Tony Green, communications director for Oregon Secretary of State Kate Brown, confirmed to The Huffington Post Tuesday.

The petition was submitted by New Approach Oregon, a Portland-based marijuana policy reform group, earlier this month. More than 87,000 signatures have been verified by Brown's office.

According to the proposed initiative text, adults 21 and over in Oregon would be able to possess up to eight ounces of marijuana at home and one ounce in public. The Oregon Liquor Control Commission would be the agency charged with regulating and monitoring the industry, similar to the regulatory model used in Washington state. Taxes collected on sales of marijuana would be distributed to schools, law enforcement and drug prevention and education programs in the state.

It appears likely that the Oregon measure will pass. A recent poll showed that 57 percent of the state's likely 2014 voters support recreational marijuana legalization. Oregon has already decriminalized cannabis and legalized it for medical use, and Gov. John Kitzhaber (D) has signaled his support for recreational marijuana legalization, should a bill make it to his desk.

"I hear the drumbeats from Washington and Colorado," Kitzhaber said in January, referring to the two U.S. states where legal, regulated marijuana markets already exist. "I want to make sure we have a thoughtful regulatory system. The legislature would be the right place to craft that."

Oregon is not the only state that will consider legalizing recreational marijuana in November. Alaska voters will also decide this fall on regulating marijuana for adults.

"With legalization initiatives qualified in two states -- with another in D.C. likely to be certified soon -- plus several recent wins on the floor of the Republican-controlled U.S. House, 2014 is shaping up to be the biggest year for marijuana reform yet," Tom Angell, chairman of the advocacy group Marijuana Majority, told HuffPost. "If we win these legalization initiatives, it's not only likely that more states will follow suit in 2016, but that presidential candidates on both sides of the aisle are going to see the value in being perceived as pro-reform."

"There's no question it's something the contenders will get asked about in debates," Angell continued. "The more wins our side puts on the board, the more likely it is the candidates will feel like they need to court voters who support legalization."
 

7greeneyes

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http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...d-marijuana-in-the-white-house-without-obama/




Snoop Dogg says he smoked marijuana in the White House — without Obama


Warning: This video contains profanity and drug use — and unsubstantiated claims of smoking marijuana at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.

Weed isn’t this legal in D.C. yet.

In an episode of his online show “GGN: The Double G News Network” that just went live, Snoop Dogg claimed he smoked Mary Jane in a White House bathroom.

Though Mr. Dogg did not explicitly say so, the implication was that President Obama was not there when the rapper toked up. For the record: Obama recently turned down pot at a bar in Denver – though, if it’s relevant, he has been known to dodge questions about whether he smokes cigarettes of the non-marijuana variety in the White House.

Dogg’s revelation came in an exchange with guest Jimmy Kimmel. Try to follow along:

Kimmel: Have you ever smoked at the White House?

Dogg [smoking what appears to be a marijuana blunt]: In the bathroom.

Kimmel: You did? In the White House.

Dogg: In the bathroom. Not in the White House — but in the bathroom. Because I said, “May I use the bathroom for a second?” And they said, “What are you going to do? No. 1 or No. 2?” I said, “No. 2.”

Kimmel: Who said this? The first lady?

Dogg: No. The CIA. Or the FBI. The alphabet boys. So I said, “Look, when I do the No. 2, I usually, you know, have a cigarette or I light something to get the aroma right.” They said, “You know what? You can light a piece of napkin.” I said, “I’ll do that.” And the napkin was this. [indicates blunt]

Kimmel: This is some story.

USA Today confirmed that the man once known as Calvin Broadus was at the White House ahead of the Kennedy Center Honors in December.

So: The man had the means, motive and opportunity.

If Dogg did indeed get lit in a bathroom at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. with the permission of an unspecified government security agency, this would not be the executive branch’s first experiment with marijuana. As everyone with a NORML bumpersticker knows, Presidents Washington and Jefferson grew hemp.
 

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/22/marijuana-policy-quiz_n_5607478.html




Put This Marijuana Quiz In Your Pipe And Smoke It


This year has already been a huge one for marijuana and pot policy, and if you don't know why, this quiz is already looking pretty tough. Whether you're an occasional toker, a hardcore marijuana policy expert or just love the fact that the substance has about 3 million different nicknames, take the quiz below and test how much you really know about pot, weed, ganja, grass, chronic, green, reefer, etc.

Be sure to click the key icon when you're done for full answers to the quiz.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/22/marijuana-policy-quiz_n_5607478.html
 

7greeneyes

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http://www.10tv.com/content/stories...rt-to-legalize-medical-marijuana-in-ohio.html




Supporters Plan High Financed Effort To Legalize Medical Marijuana in Ohio


COLUMBUS, Ohio - Using the successful 2009 casino initiative in Ohio as their model, a new group of medical marijuana supporters plan a major push to get their issue on the 2015 or 2016 statewide ballot.

10TV has confirmed from several sources that the new group will be financed by wealthy contributors in and outside Ohio. There have already been meetings to plan strategy.

There has been no decision on whether the effort will be a ballot initiative or referendum, but Ian James of Professional Petition Management has been involved in the meetings which could indicate an initiative.

The campaign would focus on the medical benefits of marijuana - including childhood epilepsy.

The group will propose 10 medical marijuana dispensaries in the state, but in what is sure to be a controversial decision, would not allow personal marijuana growing.

Simon Dunkle is a former spokesman for the Ohio Rights Group, which failed in its efforts to get medical marijuana on this November’s ballot.

Dunkle says the well-financed effort is what many grassroot activists have feared.

"I think it's the big money corporate situation that everybody was worried about," said Dunkle. "Financially it's better if you can make it a small business venture where you have people in communities making money off it and it's a local benefit to the economy."

John Pardee, president of the Ohio Rights Group, told 10TV he met with several members of the new group and told them his organization is not going away.

"We welcome multiple ballot initiatives in the future," said Pardee. "We welcome an open debate."

Earlier this year the Ohio Rights Group had been hoping for a 2014 ballot referendum that would legalize medical marijuana in the state constitution.

But the effort stalled at around 100,000 petition signatures while the group needed a minimum of 385,000 to make the ballot.

It is not known if the financial backers for the new effort will be made public.

It cost casino supporters around $48 million in 2009 for their successful campaign to legalize four casino locations across the state.

A spokesperson for both Penn National and Rock Ohio Ventures say that their companies would not be involved in a marijuana ballot issue.
 

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http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-23/legalisation-medicinal-cannabis/5617474




(Australia) Cannabis legalisation: Renewed push for NSW Government to legalise cannabis for terminally ill patients


There is a renewed push for the New South Wales Government to legalise cannabis for medicinal purposes.

The Nationals MP for Tamworth, Kevin Anderson, is due to introduce a private member's bill to Parliament next month, calling for the legalisation of the possession of 15 grams of cannabis by terminally ill patients.

Premier Mike Baird had said he was sympathetic to the move, but any solution must address concerns of supply and regulation.

But Greens MP John Kaye has called on the State Government to support medicinal cannabis and deal with supply problems later.

Let people grow their own and licence experienced ethical growers.
HEMP Party president Michael Balderstone
"We should not let the perfect be the enemy of the good," he said.

"We should make sure that people can get access to medicinal cannabis without the risk of criminal prosecution.

"That might mean in the short-term allowing people to access their drugs off the illegal market if we can't solve the legal supply market."

Mother seeks medicinal cannabis for ill son

Lucy Haslam is leading a campaign to have medicinal cannabis legalised for her terminally ill son.

Daniel Haslam was diagnosed with bowel cancer and the 24-year-old found cannabis offered some relief to the harsh effects of chemotherapy.

Ms Haslam believed Mr Baird understood her push to decriminalise cannabis for medical purposes.

"I honestly believed that Mr Baird listened to, he learnt, he was interested and I guess more importantly than that, he put himself in our shoes," she told ABC New England North West.

"He said if it was his wife or his child he would do exactly the same, and that is really the most compassionate response we have had from any of senior politicians so far."

In a statement to the ABC, the Premier said he was sympathetic to Ms Haslam's views, but wanted supply and regulation concerns addressed first.

"During my meeting with Daniel Haslam, I was struck by his determination and courage," the statement said.

"I am sympathetic to the views of the Haslam family and others who believe medical marijuana can be of great assistance to those affected by debilitating or life threatening illnesses.

"Compassion remains my key focus in this debate, but any solution must address concerns in relation to supply and regulation."

Ms Haslam told AM this morning she is now questioning the Premier's support after hearing his statement that concerns about supply and regulation must be addressed first.

"I guess I would be incredibly disappointed and confused by the language he used, so if that's the case I hope he would contact me pretty soon and clarify it," Ms Haslam said.

Michael Balderstone, president of the Help End Marijuana Prohibition (HEMP) Party, said a solution to Mr Baird's concerns could be to license growers.

"Let people grow their own and license experienced ethical growers," he said.

"Let's legalise instead of criminalise and make them legal taxpayers."

AMA recommends clinical trial of medicinal cannabis

The Australian Medical Association's (AMA) national president, Professor Brian Owler, told the ABC's AM program the organisation would recommend a clinical trial take place before any law reform.


AUDIO: NSW Premier hints at support for introduction of medicinal marijuana (AM)
"Obviously I have sympathy for [Lucy Haslam's] position, but that is not the way that we decide how to regulate medicines in this country. It is not black and white," Professor Owler said.

"While there might be clinical benefits in some cases, there are potential downsides.

"It has to be administered in the right way and we need to make sure that it is being used for the right purposes and that we are actually getting the benefits."
 

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http://www.theverge.com/2014/7/23/5927567/pot-brownies-for-dummies




The fate of Colorado's weed industry rests on these chocolate bars


Bob Eschino’s Denver-based company, Medically Correct, makes a line of tasty looking white- and dark-chocolate bars called Incredibles that come in flavors like cookie crumble and toffee. Each Hershey’s-size bar contains 100 milligrams of hash oil, which, if you ate the entire thing, would be equal to smoking about 10 joints. This is the last thing Eschino would recommend.

"The ultimate goal for recreational cannabis is to have a good time," says Eschino. "We don’t want to see people over-consuming and not having a good time."

Lately, the state’s edibles makers have not been having a good time. Since pot went legal in Colorado last December, two deaths have been linked to an over-consumption of marijuana confections, and a raft of bad press has shone a spotlight on the surprisingly powerful punch such treats pack for the novice user.

The issue isn’t that the pot goodies themselves can kill, but rather, as the recent, infamous New York Times op-ed by Maureen Dowd illustrates, they can make you scarily high: "I lay curled up in a hallucinatory state for the next eight hours." These types of stories, coupled with reports of children accidentally eating pot treats and being rushed to Colorado emergency rooms, have sounded alarm bells in the industry. Regulators in Colorado and Washington are requiring new, stricter packaging requirements for edibles. And producers like Eschino are proactively banding together to start public education campaigns to get people to consume more responsibly.

As more states tilt toward legalization, these efforts are crucial to the survival of the marijuana-edibles industry. If they succeed, these treats will be perceived like a bottle of fine scotch that gets locked away in the liquor cabinet and sipped — not guzzled — by responsible adults. If they fail, THC-infused treats run the risk of joining the original Cocaine-infused Coca-Cola as a surreal artifact of American history.

It could even jeopardize marijuana legislation in other states. Alex Kreit, a San Diego-based lawyer who studies drug policy, says he thinks some in the industry may be underestimating the potential for the edibles controversy to turn into a backlash against legalization.

"The reality is people are not going to have a lot of confidence … if they hear all these horror stories that you eat one gummy bear and you go crazy," says Kreit.

Although numbers are hard to nail down, some estimate the edibles market in Colorado is as big as 20 percent. (Washington has not yet begun to sell edibles.) Historically, cannabis-infused candies and cookies have been viewed by medical marijuana patients as a healthier alternative to smoking, with longer lasting effects that some believe is a more effective treatment for chronic pain. But the reasons for their popularity in Colorado’s recreational cannabis market may be very different.

Ean Seeb, a Denver-based cannabis industry consultant and retailer, notes that the state’s Clean Air Act makes smoking in public places and in hotels virtually impossible, and many people, particularly tourists and newbies, don’t own vaporizers. Eating pot, on the other hand, is a discreet, easy, and seemingly less-intimidating option that doesn’t require smoking equipment and can be done anywhere.

But while edibles may be more attractive to first timers for these reasons, they’re deceptively dangerous. This became clear last April, when a visiting Wyoming college student consumed six times the recommended dose of pot cookies and jumped to his death from the balcony of a Denver Holiday Inn. That same month, a Denver man fatally shot his wife while she was on the phone with 911 reporting that he was hallucinating after mixing pain killers and pot candy.

Colorado regulators responded by requiring all edibles to be tested for potency by state-certified labs, and also capped the THC content per package at 100 milligrams, or 10 servings. But then came the Maureen Dowd story, which went viral last month, and the drumbeat for further regulation. One of the refrains heard among proponents of stricter regulation is that it’s not realistic to expect Americans to limit their portion size of yummy treats, even if said treat is ultra-dosed.

"People typically sit down and eat cookies, not a cookie, and that type of eating habit is somewhat ingrained in us," says Leslie Bocskor, a Nevada-based cannabis business consultant.

Currently, Colorado’s Department of Revenue is finalizing new rules that will most likely require edible makers to score products into individual-sized 10-milligram serving pieces, similar to a Hershey’s bar, and stamp the words "10 mg" directly onto each piece. For products such as cookies, where it would be virtually impossible to do this, the edibles will have to be sold in individual 10-milligram serving-sized packages, with incentives given to producers who decide to sell only one serving at a time.

The rules are expected to be finalized and go into effect sometime in August, with producers given a three- to six-month grace period to bring their packaging into compliance. Washington State delayed its edible sales in response to the controversies in Colorado, and has adopted emergency rules similar to what Colorado is proposing. But it went even further, banning the sale of candy that might appeal to children, while still allowing baked goods like cookies and brownies.

Although some producers in Colorado are complaining about the expense that the new packaging rules will incur, others are supportive. THC-infused beverage company Dixie Elixirs, recently proactively launched a single-serving-sized watermelon flavored soda called "Dixie One." (Its other sodas contain between four and eight servings in a bottle the equivalent size of half a Snapple drink.) Julie Dooley, owner of granola-maker Julie & Kate, says she sees the value of parceling out her product into smaller serving sizes within a box.

"Someone who has never had cannabis before, or consumed it, would have to open up five separate packets and think about: 'Should I eat more?'" says Dooley. "I think that helps people with the message of 'Start low, go slow.'

"Eschino, along with other Colorado edible makers, will adjust his company's packaging to adhere to the new rules. But he says he believes that education, not packaging, is more key to curbing the problem of naïve overindulgence. The Cannabis Business Alliance, an advocacy group of which he’s a member, is putting the finishing touches on a brightly illustrated poster that spells out things like recommended serving sizes (they suggest 1 to 5 milligrams for a new consumer), the fact that you must wait for it to kick in, and the idea that you should lock your treat away from children, all illustrated with ramen package-style icons. The hope is that marijuana retailers will prominently display the poster near the point of sale. Similarly, the new Denver-based Council on Responsible Cannabis Regulation is launching a postering and education campaign around the slogan "First Time 5," which refers to the idea of eating only 5 milligrams of THC your first time. The organization is also encouraging "budtenders," the salespeople in cannabis stores, to caution buyers.

"There is certainly a case for making smaller milligram contents available for those who want it, but when you buy a bottle of vodka do you drink the whole thing? No!" says Ean Seeb, who helped put together the "First Time 5" campaign. "It might behoove you to educate yourself."

Eschino agrees that edibles are something that people are going to need to learn how to consume, just like they had to learn how much liquor they could handle when they first started drinking. He also hopes that once the novelty diminishes, so too will the bad press.

"People black out and throw up on alcohol every day and it's not a story," says Eschino "You don't go calling the newspaper saying, 'Jack Daniels got me way too drunk!'"
 

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