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MJ News for 09/25/2014

7greeneyes

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http://www.usatoday.com/story/sport...rt-tony-stewart-grand-jury-decision/16160043/




DA: Kevin Ward Jr. was under the influence of marijuana




Toxicology reports revealed Kevin Ward Jr., was under the influence of marijuana on the night he was struck and killed by a sprint car driven by Tony Stewart, Ontario County (N.Y.) District Attorney Michael Tantillo said Wednesday.

At a news conference to announce that a grand jury had declined to indict Stewart in Ward's death, Tantillo said the level of marijuana in Ward's system was high enough to impair judgment.

Later Wednesday, the Ward family indicated it was not satisfied with the decision to clear Stewart and said it will "pursue all remedies in fairness to Kevin."

Kevin Ward Jr. angrily gestured at Stewart's car as he walked down the banking of Canandaigua Motorsports Park under caution during an Aug. 9 race. He died of blunt force trauma from the impact with Stewart's car.

Tantillo said there were two charges submitted for consideration by the grand jury against Stewart: manslaughter in the second degree and criminally negligent homicide. He said neither received the necessary 12 votes from the 23-person grand jury to charge Stewart. The grand jury heard the evidence and deliberated "over the better part of two days,"

In a statement provided to the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Ward Jr.'s mother Pam said the "matter is not at rest."

"Our son got out of his car during caution while the race was suspended," she said. "All the other vehicles were reducing speed and not accelerating, except for Tony Stewart, who intentionally tried to intimidate Kevin by accelerating and sliding his car toward him, causing the tragedy.

"The focus should be on the actions of Mr. Stewart and not my son."

Pam Ward had no comment on the toxicology report that found her son had enough marijuana in his system to impair his judgment. She did not answer questions aside from the statement.

Tantillo stated Wednesday he spoke with Ward's father, saying he was "probably disappointed by the outcome but very appreciative of the work that the Ontario County Sheriff's Department and the district attorney's office had put into the case."
 

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http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/20...ss-facebook/8Ff6zV46HNe0q0lxG3TIrJ/story.html




Tewksbury pair arrested over Facebook marijuana business




Two Tewksbury residents allegedly advertised medical marijuana on Facebook and then sold it from their home.

Mark Harrington and Holly Harrington, both 28, were arrested Tuesday. They claimed on a Facebook page to operate HTM Gardening LLC out of a Patten Road home, Tewksbury police said in a statement. Mark Harrington is listed as the president and cofounder of the company on Facebook.


On the page were photos of plants they purported to be growing and cash, police said. The Facebook page said that people simply had to “fill out the new patient application below and e-mail a copy of your certification, a photo ID, and a signed health care release form so we can call to verify your certificate is valid.”

An undercover detective requested marijuana from the number listed on the page, and the Harringtons allegedly met with him and sold it to him.

During a search of their home, marijuana and prescription pills were recovered, along with several edible marijuana products, police said.

Both were arraigned Wednesday in Lowell District Court. They had not-guilty pleas entered for them to charges of conspiracy to violate drug laws; unlawful manufacture, cultivation, distribution of marijuana; and possession with intent to distribute marijuana. Mark Harrington faces an additional nine possession charges, while Holly faces six.

The pair have additional warrants for drug distribution and conspiracy.

They are being held on $3,000 bail and are due to return to court on Oct. 22.
 

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http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/24/marijuana-legalization-california/16180301/




Marijuana legalization effort begins in California




SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A U.S. marijuana advocacy group took steps Wednesday to begin raising money for a campaign to legalize recreational pot use in California in 2016, a move with potential to add a dose of extra excitement to the presidential election year.

The Marijuana Policy Project filed paperwork with the California secretary of state's office registering a campaign committee to start accepting and spending contributions for a pot legalization initiative on the November 2016 state ballot, the group said.

The measure would be similar to those passed in 2012 by voters in Colorado and Washington, the first U.S. states to legalize commercial sales of marijuana to all adults over 21.

California, long the national leader in illegal marijuana production and home to a thriving, largely unregulated medical marijuana industry, is one of the 21 other states that currently allow marijuana use only for medical reasons. The drug remains illegal under federal law.

"Marijuana prohibition has had an enormously detrimental impact on California communities. It's been ineffective, wasteful and counterproductive. It's time for a more responsible approach," Marijuana Policy Project Executive Director Rob Kampia said. "Regulating and taxing marijuana similarly to alcohol just makes sense."

The Washington, D.C.-based group also has established campaign committees to back legalization measures in Arizona, Massachusetts and Nevada in 2016.

Voters in Oregon, Alaska and the District of Columbia will weigh in on marijuana legalization in November.

In 2010, California voters rejected a ballot initiative seeking to legalize recreational pot. The measure, just like the medical marijuana law the state approved in 1996, was the first of its kind. But along with opposition from law enforcement and elected officials, Proposition 19 faced unexpected resistance from medical marijuana users and outlaw growers in the state's so-called Emerald Triangle who worried legalization would lead to plummeting marijuana prices.

Marijuana Policy Project spokesman Mason Tvert predicted no such divisions would surface this time around.

Citing his group's experience in Colorado and the advantage of aiming for a presidential election year when voter turnout is higher, Tvert said legalization supporters would use the next two years to build a broad-based coalition and craft ballot language that addresses concerns of particular constituencies.

"Obviously, it's a whole different landscape in California, where it will cost probably as much or more to just get on the ballot as it did to run a winning campaign after getting on the ballot in Colorado," he said.

League of California Cities lobbyist Tim Cromartie, whose group opposed the state's 2010 pot legalization initiative and until this year fought legislative efforts to give the state greater oversight of medical marijuana, said Wednesday that it was too soon to say what kind of opposition, if any, would greet a 2016 campaign.

Lynne Lyman, California director of the Drug Policy Alliance, said her group expects to play a major role in the legalization effort and already has started raising money. Lyman said the goal is to have an initiative written by next summer. She estimated that a pro-legalization campaign would cost $8 million to $12 million.

Even though California would be following in the steps of other states if a 2016 initiative passes, legalizing recreational marijuana use there would have far-reaching implications, Lyman said.

"When an issue is taken up in California, it becomes a national issue," she said. "What we really hope is that with a state this large taking that step, the federal government will be forced to address the ongoing issue of marijuana prohibition."
 

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http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/25/concerns-about-marijuana-and-driving/15849441/




Easing of marijuana laws worries road safety advocates




As the nation eases marijuana laws, road safety advocates worry that highway rules for driving under the influence of pot are lagging, which could lead to fatal crashes.

Medical marijuana is legal in 23 states and Washington, D.C.; adult recreational use is legal in Washington state and Colorado; marijuana has been decriminalized in 16 states and Washington, D.C..

"I'm very concerned, because I feel that we're painting the plane as we're flying it," says Jake Nelson, director of traffic safety, advocacy and research for AAA. "When we were at this stage of the game with alcohol, starting to pass laws, we knew a lot more about how alcohol affected driving performance, crash risks and how that changed with different concentrations of alcohol in a person's body."

The research is mixed on how cannabis affects driving performance. Though marijuana can slow decision-making and decrease peripheral vision, drivers under the influence of marijuana tend to drive more slowly and less aggressively, says Jonathan Adkins, executive director of the Governors Highway Safety Association.

"But if you mix it with alcohol, it has a stimulative effect," he says. "It makes reckless drivers. It makes drivers take a lot of chances. That's the biggest concern."

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the nation's primary road safety agency, says its Roadside Survey of drivers in 2007 found that 8.6% had marijuana in their system. The NHTSA is researching how state legalization of cannabis impacts the prevalence of marijuana use by drivers. It's also completing the first study of the crash risk of drivers using drugs compared with those who have no drugs in their system.

"The legalization of marijuana under state laws poses new concerns, and NHTSA has research underway to understand the effects of drugs other than alcohol on safe driving and their role in crashes," the agency said in a statement.

Adkins says the nation is putting the cart before the horse. "Traffic safety isn't even being considered in the cities and states that are considering legalization," he says. "It isn't even being considered until after the fact."

Transportation officials in Colorado, where retail marijuana sales started in January, and in Washington, where sales began in July, said they don't have any data on whether there have been any upticks in pot-related crashes, injuries or fatalities.

A study published in January in the American Journal of Epidemiology found that fatal crashes involving marijuana use tripled during the previous decade.

Researchers from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health studied fatal crash statistics from six states; they found that marijuana as a factor in fatal crashes rose from 4% in 1999 to 12% in 2010. Drugged driving overall rose from 16% of fatal crashes in 1999 to 28% in 2010.

The study authors found that combining alcohol and marijuana significantly increases a driver's risk of death. A driver under the influence of alcohol is 13 times more likely to be in a fatal crash than a sober driver; a driver under the influence of alcohol and marijuana is 24 times more likely to die in a crash than a sober driver.

The authors noted that, because traces of marijuana can be detected in the blood up to a week after use, their findings on marijuana indicate use but not necessarily impairment.

In August, New York teenager Joseph Beer was sentenced to five to 15 years in prison for a marijuana-involved crash that killed four of his friends. Beer was 17 in October 2012 when he smoked marijuana, then drove his Subaru Impreza at speeds exceeding 100 mph before crashing into a tree on the Southern State Parkway.

All five people in the vehicle were ejected; Beer was the only survivor. He pleaded guilty to aggravated vehicular homicide and driving under the influence of marijuana.


The trend toward liberalization of pot laws is rolling on: Alaska, Oregon and Washington, D.C., have November ballot measures to legalize adult recreational use; Florida has a ballot measure to legalize medical marijuana, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. On Sept. 18, Philadelphia became the latest city to decriminalize marijuana.


Six states – Colorado, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, Washington and Pennsylvania – have enacted laws or established codes setting a specific driving threshold for the amount of THC, the primary psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, in the blood, the NCSL says. Drivers in excess of those thresholds could face a charge of driving under the influence of marijuana.

Similar to the .08 blood-alcohol content threshold for driving under the influence, the threshold is set at a blood content of 5 nanograms per milliliter of blood in Colorado, Montana, Washington and Pennsylvania and at 2 nanograms in Nevada and Ohio, says Anne Tiegen, a transportation analyst at the NCSL. This year, Alabama, California, New Mexico and Pennsylvania (where the threshold is established by the state Health Department as a guideline) considered but did not pass statutes setting a threshold, Tiegen says.

Advocates say those thresholds are arbitrary, partly because they establish only the presence of THC in a person's body without determining how impaired they are.

"We know almost nothing about how (pot) affects driver performance at different concentrations in people's bodies," Nelson says. "Does it matter if you consume a lot or a little? How quickly does the substance dissipate or break down in the body? We don't know anything that we would like to know before we start to pass laws."

Road safety advocates generally agree that one of the key ways for law enforcement to combat drug-impaired driving is with drug recognition experts, specially trained police officers who can take a suspected drugged driver through a series of screens at roadside to narrow down the class of drug that is most likely impairing the driver.

The number of drug recognition experts varies widely from state to state: from more than 1,200 in California to two in Virginia, Nelson says.

Because there are so few of them in some states, by the time one arrives at a traffic stop, the active THC might have completely left a suspected drugged driver's body, Nelson says.

"There really isn't a standard in place for what constitutes impairment from using marijuana," says John Bowman of the National Motorists Association.
 

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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...galizing-taxing-marijuana-20140924-story.html




Emanuel, Lewis clash on legalizing, taxing marijuana




yor Rahm Emanuel on Wednesday knocked down potential challenger Karen Lewis' idea to legalize and tax marijuana, saying he doesn't “think you should balance the budget by promoting recreational smoking of pot.”

The mayor's comments came a day after he proposed a statewide easing of penalties for possessing small amounts of illegal narcotics including heroin and cocaine, and asked state lawmakers to adopt Chicago's ordinance allowing police to issue tickets rather than arresting people caught with fewer than 15 grams of marijuana.

Lewis, the president of the Chicago Teachers Union who's mulling a mayoral run, said in response to Emanuel's plan that legalizing marijuana as lawmakers did in Colorado and Washington is “another revenue source that we ought to look at.”

“I think it’s important for us to start thinking very differently about revenue sources,” Lewis said. “In Colorado, in the first quarter alone, the state generated $80 million. Come on. Not only that, but having a sensible drug policy stops a lot of other silliness.”

From January to the end of June, recreational marijuana sales in Colorado generated about $21.6 million in taxes and fees, according to the Colorado Department of Revenue. Medical marijuana sales, which are taxed at a much lower rate in Colorado, generated about $18.6 million in taxes and fees from July 2013 to the end of June 2014, according to that state’s revenue department.

Told that the mayor criticized her idea, Lewis said the casino that Emanuel wants to build in Chicago to boost revenue would be much more damaging to Chicagoans than legalized cannabis.

“I know for a fact that casinos have a devastating effect on families and communities, and people have lost their houses because they have gambling addictions and problems,” Lewis said. “But recreational usage of marijuana is worse? Come on. How do you compare that, to you also promoting casinos, which damage families way, way, way worse?”

Speaking at a news conference at the Shedd Aquarium on Great Lakes water standards, Emanuel also acknowledged he “made a mistake” by deciding to name a proposed selective enrollment North Side high school after President Barack Obama, whom he once served as chief of staff.

Emanuel, who's trying to mend fences with black voters ahead of the February 2015 city election, reversed course last week following criticism from African-American officials who feel it's an affront to bestow the honor on an exclusive school in an affluent, predominantly white part of the city.

“In my rush to honor our favorite son, I made a mistake,” Emanuel said. “I heard the community, and it's not going to be named after the president.”


African-American aldermen said they told the mayor shortly after he announced plans for Barack Obama College Preparatory High School in April that a school named after the president should be located on the South Side, where Obama has a home and got his start as a community organizer.

Emanuel said his goal is to secure the Obama presidential library as something that would be named after the president. And he said the now-unnamed selective enrollment high school will still “probably” be built on the Near North Side because there are ample resources in the special taxing districts in that part of the city to cover the $60 million construction cost.
 

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/22/legal-marijuana-taxes_n_5863860.html




Marijuana Tax Revenue May Top $3 Billion A Year With Legalization




Money may not grow on trees, but it apparently does grow on marijuana plants. If all 50 states legalized cannabis today, they'd be collectively raking in more than $3 billion a year in taxes.

That's according to NerdWallet, a personal finance site, which forecasts a total $3.1 billion annual windfall for state governments that legalize the popular plant.

California would gain the most from legalization. NerdWallet projects the Golden State would generate more than $519 million per year, which the website points out would almost fund the entire 2013 budget for California's Department of Parks and Recreation. New York would be second, with $248 million, NerdWallet said. Seven additional states would bring in $100 million or more from legalization, and 25 others would stand to make at least $20 million per year.

NerdWallet's estimate assumed a flat, 15 percent excise tax on marijuana -- the same as Colorado's excise tax on recreational marijuana sales. NerdWallet added state and local sales taxes to that figure.

The site didn't subtract medical marijuana tax revenues in the 23 states that allow medicinal use of cannabis. The post-prohibition forecast also failed to calculate reduced government spending on law enforcement. In 2010, Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron estimated more than $8 billion in annual savings in law enforcement costs if marijuana were legalized.

To estimate marijuana sales in each state, NerdWallet used the widely cited Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Surveys on Drug Use and Health to find the number of marijuana consumers aged 25 and older. NerdWallet calculated the approximate number of pot users in each state, and applied the percentage to the U.S. population. It estimated the total U.S. marijuana market at $14 billion, as projected by Miron.

Of course, tax rates in states may vary wildly from NerdWallet's 15 percent assumption. And estimating a marketplace for a substance that has been banned and stigmatized may be fraught. In Colorado, where recreational marijuana is legal, recreational marijuana tax revenue has been far lower than predicted.

Still, recent studies have projected that the U.S. marijuana industry may reach $8 billion to to $10 billion in sales by 2018.

In 2012, Colorado and Washington state legalized recreational marijuana. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for medical use. In November, Oregon and Alaska voters will cast ballots on the legalization of recreational marijuana, voters in Florida will decide on a medical marijuana ballot measure, and Washington, D.C., voters will consider legalizing recreational marijuana possession and use.

Take a look at NerdWallet's map of the United States below to see tax revenues your state might expect from legal, regulated marijuana:

View attachment marijuanachart.jpg
 

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http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2014/09/24/pennsylvania-senate-oks-medical-marijuana-bill/




Despite Governor’s Objection, Pa. Senate OKs Medical Marijuana Bill




HARRISBURG, Pa. (CBS) — The Pennsylvania state senate today voted overwhelmingly in favor of a bill that would legalize medical marijuana in Pennsylvania, but the odds are steep against the measure becoming law in the current legislative session.

The Republican-controlled Senate voted 43-7 in favor of medical marijuana.

The measure was championed by state senator Daylin Leach, a suburban Philadelphia Democrat.

“This is going to help people who are in desperate situations,” he said.
Under the proposal, state residents would need an access card from the state health department after proving they have a practitioner-patient relationship and written confirmation of a qualifying medical condition.

But one big problem for supporters is governor Tom Corbett. His spokesman, Jay Pagni, says the governor’s position has not changed.

“The governor is opposed to the legalization of marijuana for either purpose: recreational or medicinal,” Pagni said today.

Corbett has proposed a limited research pilot program. But even before the bill can get to him, it has to go through the state House, where, with only a handful of days left in the current session, a spokesman for the majority leader says the medical marijuana bill will have to be reviewed and vetted during at least one hearing.

All bills not passed this year will have to be reintroduced next year.

The legislative debate had been propelled by parents who believe a marijuana oil extract can help their seizure-wracked children.

A handful of drug delivery methods that do not involve smoking it would be permitted under the bill, including extracted oil, edible products, ointments, and tinctures.

More than 30 other states have legalized some form of medical marijuana, according to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.
 

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http://www.foxnews.com/science/2014...-marijuana-level-as-indicator-use-wastewater/




(Washington) Spokane sewage could be tested for marijuana level as indicator of use; wastewater doesn't lie




SPOKANE, Wash. – The author of Washington's recreational marijuana law has suggested that Spokane test its sewage for traces of the cannabis chemical THC, to get a more accurate picture of pot use by residents.

American Civil Liberties Union lawyer Alison Holcomb proposed the idea at a Tuesday meeting of the City Council's marijuana policy subcommittee.

A scientist for the University of Washington said the proposal is a good idea.

"It's always good for a chuckle, but it does actually work," Caleb Banta-Green, a researcher at the University of Washington's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, said Wednesday.

Banta-Green has tested sewage in Oregon and Washington for the presence of illegal drugs like cocaine and methamphetamine.

Holcomb said Wednesday that testing sewage for THC provides a more accurate level of trends than self-reporting on surveys, in which people are asked about their drug use. People often give wrong information when questioned about drug use, she said.

"We can expect to see more honesty" in the sewage, she said.

There are many things to be learned from testing for the presence of illegal drugs in sewage, Banta-Green said.

Testing the sewage would provide a more accurate picture of the quantities of illegal drugs a community is consuming, he said. And testing over time would provide a picture of what days people are using, he said.

Banta-Green's tests in Oregon, for instance, revealed that meth users tended to consume drugs daily, while cocaine users concentrated their use on weekends, he said.

Holcomb said state policymakers are very interested in learning whether marijuana use goes up or down as a result of legalization.

"Looking at wastewater gives us a more accurate way to observe trends," Holcomb said.

The City Council subcommittee meeting included representatives of schools, law enforcement agencies, nonprofits and local government to discuss what information needs to be collected as policymakers look to maximize marijuana revenue while ensuring public safety.

Testing sewage, which can be frozen for later inspection, would provide only general use figures, not data broken down by age, Holcomb told the subcommittee.

Councilman Jon Snyder supported the idea.

"What an awesome new use for our sewage," he said, according to The Spokesman-Review.

Spokane wastewater director Dale Arnold said he would check with a lab this week to find out how difficult it is to get THC readings from wastewater.
 

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http://www.chicagotribune.com/busin...ense-seekers-tops-outlook-20140924-story.html




Number of marijuana license seekers in Illinois tops expectations




linois received 369 applications for medical marijuana business licenses, which means about 1 in 5 applications will win approval to open grow houses and retail centers in the state.

The state received 211 applications for dispensaries — retail shops for medical marijuana — and 158 applications for grow centers. Illinois will allow 60 dispensaries statewide and 21 grow centers.

Bob Morgan, statewide project coordinator for the Illinois Medical Cannabis Pilot Program, said the number of applications, which were due Monday, was higher than anticipated.

“We were pleased to see that our expectation of a competitive process played out so well,” Morgan said, “so we can choose the best applicants.”

The next step will be to go through thousands of pages of documents, Morgan said, identifying any missing information and informing applicants, who will have seven days from notification to update applications. Teams of reviewers will look at the applications blind — applicants submitted redacted and unredacted versions — to award points.

Morgan said the state aims to have licenses awarded by the end of the year. Illinois’ medical marijuana law was signed in July.

Neil Khot, a technology professional from Hoffman Estates said one of the most tedious tasks leading up to the application deadline was redacting the necessary information and making photocopies.

“Some people were redacting while standing in the line,” said Khot, who arrived at the James R. Thompson Center downtown 20 minutes before deadline.


Khot applied for five dispensary licenses for locations in Schaumburg, Naperville, St. Charles, Bartlett and Arlington Heights. He said he worked on the applications for a year.

“The last two weeks have been crazy,” Khot said. “I worked straight for three continuous days hardly sleeping, maybe an hour or so at night. … I have a good team of six to eight people supporting me too. It was not easy.”

Khot said he thought the applications were appropriately thorough, though. He thinks it’s fair that the state will review applications blindly at first, he said. Still, it took him two days to block out all the necessary information and photocopy his five applications, which averaged about 400 pages each.

Khot hopes the state will award licenses soon, he said.

“Business owners are paying money, and there’s no income,” Khot said. “My hope is this will be done in two months, maybe three at the latest. On top of it, the patients are waiting.”
 

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http://www.rte.ie/news/2014/0925/647928-ni-drugs/




'Scratch & sniff' cards to help detect cannabis factories in Northern Ireland




The PSNI initiated the scheme in an attempt to reduce the number of cannabis factories in Northern Ireland.

Police officers are to distribute the cards to the public to educate and inform them about the signs of how to spot cannabis factories by recognising the smell of the growing drug.

The scratch card contains an element that replicates the smell of cannabis in its growing state, which is a different smell to when it is being smoked.

The campaign comes as figures reveal there was a 44% increase in cannabis factories across Northern Ireland in 2013-14.

A total of 130 cannabis factories were found last year, and so far this year 49 factories have been found.

The PSNI has also produced a video giving advice and guidance to help recognise the tell-tale signs of a cannabis factory.
 

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http://slog.thestranger.com/slog/ar...e-hosts-free-cannabis-infused-coffee-tastings




(Washington) Seattle "Lifestyle Boutique" Hosts Free (!?) Cannabis-Infused Coffee Tastings




Trichome—which is "a lifestyle boutique, not a marijuana retailer" in the ID, according to events coordinator Gwen—is hosting its own version of wake-and-bake with a series of free Sunday morning tastings of "Cannabis & Coffee." The first one is this Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ("Decibel Festival hangovers welcome!"), and the "Elevated Coffee" is "an elegant blend" of pour-over coffee and cannabis-infused coconut oil. They're using beans from Lighthouse in Fremont, and Gwen says the idea is modeled on "bulletproof" coffee. The tastings are 21-and-over only.

Is this legal? Washington State Liquor Control Board spokesperson Mikhail Carpenter says that while giving away pot in whatever form is technically illegal, they wouldn't have any jurisdiction over an operation that does not hold a pot retailing license—that'd be a matter for local law enforcement. On that front, Seattle Police Department spokesperson Sean Whitcomb says, "We do have our priorities, and those priorities start with violent crime, property crime, and other quality-of-life issues," and that the SPD response to, say, a cannabis-infused coffee tasting would be data- or complaint-driven—that is, data that there's a lot of crime in the area around the time of the tastings (at which we both laughed), or if neighboring businesses express concern (which also seems unlikely). "We're a responsive government agency," he said. "I doubt it's gonna rate for the narcotics section."

Moreover, is this pot-infused coffee thing a good idea? To me, it sounds like a poor man's speedball, with the coffee as the giddyup and the pot as the whoa, man. David Schmader opines that it all depends on whether it tastes good; otherwise, you could just get high and have a cup of coffee separately. And as with any ingestion of marijuana, you'd want to be very careful about your dose. The logical thing to do afterward would be to go eat your weight in dim sum at Jade Garden, but first you'd have to wait a million years crammed into their foyer, which might bum your stone. Sure, there are tons of other good places to eat in the ID, but you'd reallllllllly want Jade Garden.
 

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