Moonlight?

Tool46

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Hello everyone i hope all is well. I was just curious, why it has to be completely dark for flower inside? When weed has been growing outside forever under the moonlight. I know your going to say well cuz its moonlight ok well if so then how can i add moonlight into my grow room? Or is this a dumb question? Thanx to all who reply!:confused:
 

ganjabanned

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2 things to consider:
Moonlight is far dimmer than most people believe. It's also a lot smaller (about the size of a dime held at arm's length) than people think. Because
-It's by far the brightest object in the nighttime sky
-and Popular Culture depicts things like people kissing silhoetted by the moon (doesn't happen).
Secondly, moonlight is the proper spectrum to not affect the plant. Moonlight is simply reflected sunlight but it's a different spectrum than sunlight.

You don't need to simulate moonlight.

Flowering can be prevented by as small of a light as the little red light on a power strip.

Also, outdoor plants can take a lot more light at night and be unaffected by it than indoor plants. I don't know exactly why.
My friend had a plant in full flower and yet because of a streetlight it was bright enough in his backyard to read the date on a quarter.
 

Mutt

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well first. never a dumb question only a dumb answer. ;)
Just seen the same question on another post from another member.
Moonlight is miniscule in the amount of light thats reflected off of it.
Any light leaks are bad news. Some control the amount of light by using low wattage "green color" incadescent light bulbs. but it is best ID grows to just leave it sealed up in pitch black in the off hours. Any risk of light stress during dark hours is something that should be avoided like the plague. ID grow is totally different than OD growing. two totally different beasts.
 

Tool46

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So i guess my question is.. Is ther an artificial light. That would be a so called moonlight?
 
S

Stoney Bud

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Tool46 said:
So i guess my question is.. Is there an artificial light. That would be a so called moonlight?
I've never heard of any kind of light that claims to be "moonlight" or it's equal.

Here's a quote from a Cornell University Botany Dept Admin named David Hershey that discusses the subject of using a green light while in a darkness cycle in regards to plant growth:

"One of the most common misconceptions about photosynthesis is that leaves reflect all the green light and do not use green light in photosynthesis. The truth is that leaves typically absorb half or more of the green wavelengths, and green light is used fairly efficiently in photosynthesis. Most leaves do reflect more green light than other colors so leaves appear green to our eyes."

The entire web-page can be seen at:
CLICK HERE

If you MUST go into a dark growroom, I'd suggest using a very low wattage dark green light that is dim enough to require you to stand still for a couple of minutes in the dark room while your eyes adjust to the dim green light. Keep the light as far from the plants as possible.

With the multitude of strains in the world today and their different reactions to stimuli of all kinds, I would strongly discourage the use of any type of light in a MJ growroom while it is in the darkness cycle.

On one strain you may get away with it, in another you may not.

It's a costly mistake if it ruins a flowering.

Here is an interesting relationship chart on footcandles of light from different sources:

Footcandle Values
Starlight .0001fc
Moonlight .02fc
Overcast daylight 1,000fc
Direct Sun 10,000fc

You can see that direct sunlight is a half million times brighter than moonlight.

10K/.02=500,000

Even an overcast day is 50,000 times brighter than moonlight.


Good luck to you man. If you find out anything new on this, I'd be very interested.
 

Mutt

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Hey stoney I love debating with ya man. Been a while since we had a report debate. ;) There are so many reports that contradict each other out there.

Photosynthesis and color spectrum note:
msn encarta said:
Light contains many colors, each with a defined range of wavelengths measured in nanometers, or billionths of a meter. Certain red and blue wavelengths of light are the most effective in photosynthesis because they have exactly the right amount of energy to energize, or excite, chlorophyll electrons and boost them out of their orbits to a higher energy level. Other pigments, called accessory pigments, enhance the light-absorption capacity of the leaf by capturing a broader spectrum of blue and red wavelengths, along with yellow and orange wavelengths. None of the photosynthetic pigments absorb green light; as a result, green wavelengths are reflected, which is why plants appear green.
and also, this link is for tool46
Here is a link that gets into light and photosynthesis. If you like tech. stuff its worth a read.
http://www.sunmastergrowlamps.com/SunmLightandPlants.html

Original Paper: Link added by Stoney CLICK HERE
 
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Stoney Bud

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That's an interesting article you've found. However, the statements made in it in regards to green light not being used in photosynthesis is the very reason that Dr. D.R.Hershey wrote the article I included. His articles are provided with references to testing procedures and results that prove beyond any doubt that green light is absorbed to the extent of nearly half of it's total, by a plants photosynthetic pigments.

Secondary pigments are advanced study usually performed at college level. Even many college texts still use out of date material in this regard.

When photosynthesis is discussed in lower level schools and texts, only Chlorophyll (A) is generally spoken of.

[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Dr. Hershey's article is one directed to the teachers of botany so that they can correct their texts and class instruction. His works are accepted by all botanists because of the extensive testing results he provides to enforce his statements.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Instruction texts and most research texts only discuss chlorophyll (a).[/FONT]
As shown in the below text from the same source you used, (Encarta), chlorophyll (B) also absorbs "light energy of a different wavelength". Encarta doesn't explain it in depth, but one of the other wavelengths absorbed by chlorophyll (B) is the green wavelength. Because of the reflectivity of chlorophyll (A) much green light is reflected away from the plants receptors, but almost half of the available green wavelength is absorbed and used in photosynthesis. Dr. Hershey is considered the authority in this area of study.
[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]"Several kinds of chlorophyll exist. They differ from each other in details of their molecular structure and absorb slightly different wavelengths of light. The most common type is chlorophyll a, making up about 75 percent of the chlorophyll in green plants. It is also found in cyanobacteria (formerly known as blue-green algae) and in more complex photosynthetic cells. Chlorophyll b is an accessory pigment present in plants and other complex photosynthetic cells; it absorbs light energy of a different wavelength and transfers it to chlorophyll a for ultimate conversion to chemical energy."[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]For the complete article, CLICK HERE


[/FONT]
Mutt said:
Hey stoney I love debating with ya man. Been a while since we had a report debate. ;) There are so many reports that contradict each other out there.

Photosynthesis and color spectrum note:


and also, this link is for tool46
Here is a link that gets into light and photosynthesis. If you like tech. stuff its worth a read.
http://www.sunmastergrowlamps.com/SunmLightandPlants.html

Original Paper: Link added by Stoney CLICK HERE
 

Mutt

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I can see the point you made Stoney. I just refered to another book and a chart cleared it up a little. There will always be a minimal portion of green being absorbed. but would need a vast amount to possibly trigger photosynthesis. IMHO.
But this is the article that made me see it. Thanks stoney. this was a fun way to spend sunday mornin. Gotta love learnin somethin new.

In photosynthesis the electron transport pathway is an integral part of the light reactions. Light that we see and plants use for photosynthesis is a small part of the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, from just below 400 nm to just above 700 nm. Our peak sensitivity is in the middle of this range at about 550 nm or in the green part of the spectrum. Coincidentally this is the part of the spectrum which plants do not use or "see". They absorb light in the blue and in the red.
The light is absorbed by pigments, chlorophyll which absorbs red and blue light (and appears green) and carotenoids which absorb in the blue (and appear yellow). (The presence of magnesium at the center of the chlorophyll molecule accounts for much of the requirement for this element as a plant nutrient)
Article from Ohio State Univ.
 
S

Stoney Bud

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Mutt said:
There will always be a minimal portion of green being absorbed. but would need a vast amount to possibly trigger photosynthesis. IMHO.
Hey Mutt, the intensity of low level light is what would trigger photosynthesis. Once a usable light source emits light that contacts the photosynthetic cells of a plant, photosynthesis is triggered. If this light is of the green wavelength, it also triggers the photosynthesis regardless of it's exact wavelength. If that green light is dimmed to a point that the plant doesn't "see" it, then as the same with any color of light, photosynthesis isn't triggered.

This is a hard concept for people to understand after a lifetime of being told in the classroom that green light isn't used by plants in photosynthesis. A plant won't live if green light is the only light it receives, but it will use any green wavelength light that is absorbed before reflection from the green chlorophyll.

It is fun to debate. It also helps lock in new information.

I hope your Sunday is a relaxing and fun one!
 

Tool46

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thanx for all the replys. Thanx stoney bud
"Footcandle Values
Starlight .0001fc
Moonlight .02fc
Overcast daylight 1,000fc
Direct Sun 10,000fc"
makes alot more sence now.
 

Hick

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Wow..excellent reading. I've always believed green was totally reflected. Glad I haven't employed that method to work on plants.

Secondary pigments are advanced study usually performed at college level.
secondary pigment is the one on the left..:D
 

Mutt

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Stoney Bud said:
Hey Mutt,

I hope your Sunday is a relaxing and fun one!
Of course I feel the same. Points well made, and a very good read for others. Very good sunday read. ;)
 
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Stoney Bud

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Hick said:
Wow..excellent reading. I've always believed green was totally reflected. Glad I haven't employed that method to work on plants.

secondary pigment is the one on the left..:D
"the one on the left".... Hick, you're killin me! Hahhaahahahaha
 

Mutt

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All I see is some babyback ribs smothered in BBQ, and some stuffed pork chops. :D
 

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