Splitting the stem

SubmarineGirl

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Anyone ever heard of this? Got it off the ILGM page…

BONUS: Split the stem
There is one method of increasing the yield of your marijuana plants that not everyone knows about — splitting the stem. This will help your plants’ buds be heavier and denser and will improve THC production as well.

This technique is exactly what it sounds like — it involves splitting the stem of your marijuana plant right at the bottom. It likely originated in China and Southeast Asia.

Split the stem more thc
Split the stem more thc
Split the stem increase yield
Split the stem increase yield
To be successful with the stem splitting technique, start out by tying the stem right at the base, just above the soil. Tie a second rope or cable tie a couple inches above that. Take a very sharp knife and cut from the top tie to the bottom tie. There should be one vertical cut that is a few inches in length.

The knife should remain inside until you have a pencil, chopsticks, or other objects to replace it with to keep both sides of the marijuana plant from touching each other. Remove the knife partially and rotate it to allow the chopstick or pencil enough space. Leave the ties in place, so the damage does not spread.

ILGM_Split-the-stem.jpg

The thing about splitting the stem is that it is a tricky technique to master, so you should only try it on one plant per growing season until you are confident you’ve gotten it down. Apply this technique a few days or a week before harvest, not sooner.



Produce more THC
The purpose of stem splitting is to disturb the flow of nutrients and water right at the base of the stem. Because of this, the plant will start producing more trichomes and more THC. Trichomes are responsible for making heavier, denser buds that are just better overall, so you can see why this is a useful technique. All cannabinoids are created in the trichomes.
 

WeedHopper

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The other pictures look like the stem was split all the way up. Only one picture shows it split a few inches.
That confuses me that splitting the stem would allow more nutrients and growth with a damaged stem. Very weird.
I know that worms can kill a plant by eating the middle of stem. You would think that would open it up to bugs and disease.
 

WeedHopper

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What Are The Risks Of Stem Splitting?
As just mentioned, stem splitting can be really hard on a plant because of just how aggressive this technique is. Subjecting your cannabis plant to high levels of stress just before completion of the bloom cycle is risky. We recommend only experienced growers branch out into this technique, especially those who are really trying to push their potency to the limit for concentrates. Stem splitting is also not advised for autoflowering strains, as it’s simply way too extreme for them.

Has The Efficacy Of Stem Splitting Been Proven?
Many skilled growers swear by stem splitting as a way to pump up their harvest in both potency and yield. Unfortunately, there’s not a lot of scientific data to back up these claims. All we know is that stem splitting supposedly originated in Holland back in the 1970s. We can’t point you in the direction of hard data, so it’s up to you to decide whether or not you believe the hype.
 

SubmarineGirl

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The other pictures look like the stem was split all the way up. Only one picture shows it split a few inches.
That confuses me that splitting the stem would allow more nutrients and growth with a damaged stem. Very weird.
I know that worms can kill a plant by eating the middle of stem. You would think that would open it up to bugs and disease.
I’m pretty sure it’s just a few inches.
 

SubmarineGirl

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What Are The Risks Of Stem Splitting?
As just mentioned, stem splitting can be really hard on a plant because of just how aggressive this technique is. Subjecting your cannabis plant to high levels of stress just before completion of the bloom cycle is risky. We recommend only experienced growers branch out into this technique, especially those who are really trying to push their potency to the limit for concentrates. Stem splitting is also not advised for autoflowering strains, as it’s simply way too extreme for them.

Has The Efficacy Of Stem Splitting Been Proven?
Many skilled growers swear by stem splitting as a way to pump up their harvest in both potency and yield. Unfortunately, there’s not a lot of scientific data to back up these claims. All we know is that stem splitting supposedly originated in Holland back in the 1970s. We can’t point you in the direction of hard data, so it’s up to you to decide whether or not you believe the hype.
Yes would be a sonofabitch to loose a whole stem and the 8 buds you were trying to make bigger in the process. one would need to be careful for sure. I already have my mainline experiment going on with one of my plants. May take a stab at it on one plant depending what my stems feel like at that time…
 

bigsur51

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Produce more THC
The purpose of stem splitting is to disturb the flow of nutrients and water right at the base of the stem. Because of this, the plant will start producing more trichomes and more THC. Trichomes are responsible for making heavier, denser buds that are just better overall, so you can see why this is a useful technique. All cannabinoids are created in the trichomes.



not true

wounded plants produce hormones for cellular and root growth , not trichomes

do some research on wounded plants and auxins





AUXINS
Natural Auxins. All plants produce natural auxins (Fig. 1) that they use for the regulation of growth, flower formation, fruit formation, fruit abscission and for the initiation of roots (Devlin, 1969; Salibury, 1955). The auxins, indole-acetic acid, in- dole-3-butyric acid, and indole-4-chloro-butyric acid have specific functions depend- ing on the time of year and the physiological state of the plant. All are manufac- tured in the leaves and the apical buds and transported basipetally throughout the plant. The natural auxins are under the control of various feed-back and counter chemical relationships so that no particular auxin can get out of control. All indole auxins are under continual degradation by IAA-oxidase and IAA peroxidase en- zymes, which breakdown the hormones after they have done their job and prevent an extraneous build up (Kenton, 1955).



Abstract
Plants undergoing the onslaught of wound‐causing agents activate mechanisms directed to healing and further defence. Responses to mechanical damage are either local or systemic or both and hence involve the generation, translocation, perception, and transduction of wound signals to activate the expression of wound‐inducible genes. Although the central role for jasmonic acid in plant responses to wounding is well established, other compounds, including the oligopeptide systemin, oligosaccharides, and other phytohormones such as abscisic acid and ethylene, as well as physical factors such as hydraulic pressure or electrical pulses, have also been proposed to play a role in wound signalling. Different jasmonic acid‐dependent and –independent wound signal transduction pathways have been identified recently and partially characterized. Components of these signalling pathways are mostly similar to those implicated in other signalling cascades in eukaryotes, and include reversible protein phosphorylation steps, calcium/calmodulin‐regulated events, and production of active oxygen species. Indeed, some of these components involved in transducing wound signals also function in signalling other plant defence responses, suggesting that cross‐talk events may regulate temporal and spatial activation of different defences.
 

SubmarineGirl

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Produce more THC
The purpose of stem splitting is to disturb the flow of nutrients and water right at the base of the stem. Because of this, the plant will start producing more trichomes and more THC. Trichomes are responsible for making heavier, denser buds that are just better overall, so you can see why this is a useful technique. All cannabinoids are created in the trichomes.



not true

wounded plants produce hormones for cellular and root growth , not trichomes

do some research on wounded plants and auxins





AUXINS
Natural Auxins. All plants produce natural auxins (Fig. 1) that they use for the regulation of growth, flower formation, fruit formation, fruit abscission and for the initiation of roots (Devlin, 1969; Salibury, 1955). The auxins, indole-acetic acid, in- dole-3-butyric acid, and indole-4-chloro-butyric acid have specific functions depend- ing on the time of year and the physiological state of the plant. All are manufac- tured in the leaves and the apical buds and transported basipetally throughout the plant. The natural auxins are under the control of various feed-back and counter chemical relationships so that no particular auxin can get out of control. All indole auxins are under continual degradation by IAA-oxidase and IAA peroxidase en- zymes, which breakdown the hormones after they have done their job and prevent an extraneous build up (Kenton, 1955).



Abstract
Plants undergoing the onslaught of wound‐causing agents activate mechanisms directed to healing and further defence. Responses to mechanical damage are either local or systemic or both and hence involve the generation, translocation, perception, and transduction of wound signals to activate the expression of wound‐inducible genes. Although the central role for jasmonic acid in plant responses to wounding is well established, other compounds, including the oligopeptide systemin, oligosaccharides, and other phytohormones such as abscisic acid and ethylene, as well as physical factors such as hydraulic pressure or electrical pulses, have also been proposed to play a role in wound signalling. Different jasmonic acid‐dependent and –independent wound signal transduction pathways have been identified recently and partially characterized. Components of these signalling pathways are mostly similar to those implicated in other signalling cascades in eukaryotes, and include reversible protein phosphorylation steps, calcium/calmodulin‐regulated events, and production of active oxygen species. Indeed, some of these components involved in transducing wound signals also function in signalling other plant defence responses, suggesting that cross‐talk events may regulate temporal and spatial activation of different defences.
Wow! I guess I’ve been schooled. You give me way to much credit tho for being able to understand all those big words but I get the message don’t attempt the experiment at this time…
 

bigsur51

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Wow! I guess I’ve been schooled. You give me way to much credit tho for being able to understand all those big words but I get the message don’t attempt the experiment at this time…

oh its ok to experiment , I’ve had big plants split right in half and still live for 30-60 days before harvest

I did not notice any trichome increase from the other sister plants , same genetics

so yeah , the cannabis plant has a strong genetic code to survive , unlike my orchid , all I have to do is look at it and it will die..
 

SubmarineGirl

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oh its ok to experiment , I’ve had big plants split right in half and still live for 30-60 days before harvest

I did not notice any trichome increase from the other sister plants , same genetics

so yeah , the cannabis plant has a strong genetic code to survive , unlike my orchid , all I have to do is look at it and it will die..
8DA7972D-CA95-4FC0-9C64-06018A5DB2CC.jpeg

my orchid 😂
 

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