sterilizing the soil a must do or just precautionary

epicstuff

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I can't get all these fancy brands everybody keeps talking about. but My garden center does their own 3 way mix of earth, coconut and Cow crap.

I don't expect it to be sterilized. I read in one article that normal soil should be sterilized in the oven at 250 degrees.

my qusetion is this .. is it vital or just precautionary in event of worst case scenario?

Seems a big task baking 100 kg or so of dirt in the oven . but I also dont want to risk an infected grow either.
 

JustAnotherAntMarching

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baking the cow crap must def make your house smell awesome... Ive never heard of such a thing....
 

orangesunshine

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only time i heard of cooking soil is when it is amended and turned like a compost heap---surely literally baking soil in the oven would destroy your micro colony and that would be no bueno---you don't need some fancy brand soil to grow the herb---i would stay away from someone elses home made brew and buy yourself some regular brand name bagged potting soil---
 

4u2sm0ke

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only thing Ive read that needs cooked in the oven is "Sand" the other cooking is when I turn the fresh compost for cooking


take care and be safe
 

epicstuff

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Ok well Thats one nasty job I won't have to do . where did I read I think 'greenman tips'

anyway I live in a developing country so no branded product they have regular pre bagged stuff they sell to farms. But there is no indication as to what compostion it is or how fertilized it is.
 

orangesunshine

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if you got peeps selling soil they should know its composition---ask them what the N-P-K ratio is and what most of their customers are growing---i would get the one with the highest N to get you started---you can always supplement the soil as needed
 

tastyness

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orangesunshine said:
if you got peeps selling soil they should know its composition---ask them what the N-P-K ratio is and what most of their customers are growing---i would get the one with the highest N to get you started---you can always supplement the soil as needed

You would think that-but not the case. Labeling in other countries can be very, very different. Most of the nutes where I'm at don't even label for N-P-K!
And the soil- forget it! There is nothing on the market here that is not pre-nuted.

Can you get your hands on some coco coir bricks?
 

sMACkaddict

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hope this isn't too much, too late...


Using live compost or biologically active garden soil in your potting mixes often requires two extra steps — screening and then heat-treating or pasteurizing the material at 160 degrees to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. I like to use the compost made from garden waste to make potting soil, so whenever a batch looks good, I screen some and put it in plastic pails, bins or bags (such as those saved from purchased potting soil). My compost screen is a piece of half-inch mesh plastic fencing stapled to two pieces of scrap lumber. Many people use a similar version, with the screen attached to a sturdy wood frame. Stored where it can stay lightly moist, screened compost continues to cure and improves with age.

When you have excellent-quality, cured compost, and you’re not working with light-stressed little seedlings (the most disease-prone of all green beings), it’s fine to go ahead and mix up a 50:50 mixture of compost and good soil, and try it out. Or use more compost and less soil. My garden waste compost often contains quite a bit of soil already, mostly from the roots of pulled plants, so I often go with three parts compost to one part soil when potting plants that are ready for a rich, outdoorsy mix that gives them a nice taste of their future.

Now for the risks. The bioactive nature of compost makes it an ideal primary food source for your garden’s soil food web, but teeming colonies of random fungi and bacteria are the last thing you want in containers. Many of the microbes in compost specialize in breaking down dead plant matter, but if they are deprived of food they often find ways to invade live plant tissues. Good examples are the cadre of fungi that cause seedlings to rot off at the soil’s surface, called “damping off.” These fungi are usually present in compost, but when forced to compete with other microorganisms in open soil, they stick to a dead-plant diet. But when let loose in a flat of tomatoes, with little or no appropriate food or competition, they will go after tender new roots and stems rather than starve.

Numerous studies have shown that pasteurization, which involves heating compost or soil to 160 degrees for an hour, or 180 degrees for 30 minutes, kills a high percentage of all fungi and bacteria (the good and the bad), while preserving the biological integrity of the material — and its ability to suppress other diseases. Pasteurization kills persistent insects such as fungus gnats, too, along with all but a few heat-resistant weed seeds. The temperature must not go above 190 degrees, which can result in the formation of compounds that hinder plant growth.


source: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Organic-Gardening/How-To-Make-Your-Own-Potting-Soil.aspx?page=2



sMACk
 

pcduck

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nice smack, but a good compost pile will heat itself up to those temps or nearly will. The problems arrives with the smaller compost piles and growers not putting enough high N greens in to heat their pile up.

Stir and dig from the center:)
 

sMACkaddict

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thanks pcduck! But I'm basically readin this stuff as I'm pastin it over... haha I mean I looked this up the other day for myself and remembered it.. I'm sure I'll have more to say once I get my vury own compost up 'n cookin...

I'm just mad that I don't know more about composting and soil and gardening. I mean its what we eat, its really what we are! Its crazy, they should be teachin this shizz in school! haha they might have for all I know! :stoned:


sMACk
 

pcduck

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Yeah once you get into organics you begin to realize it is not just dirt and there is so much to learn. but it sure is fun learning :bong:
 
T

The Hemp Goddess

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pcduck said:
Yeah once you get into organics you begin to realize it is not just dirt and there is so much to learn. but it sure is fun learning :bong:

LOL--reminds me of Hodgins on "Bones". "There is no such thing as dirt."
 

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