Advertise On Marijuana Passion

Stressing the plant.

FUM

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
590
Reaction score
31
:icon_smile: I just read that stressing the plant gives bigger,fatter buds. But not to much. I'm looking for more info on this stressing during flowering issue plz.:icon_smile:
 

BBFan

Days of Wine and....Roses
Joined
May 23, 2008
Messages
2,075
Reaction score
1,006
Never heard of this FUM. My experience has been stress makes smaller buds.

Unless you mean pruning popcorn buds. While it does cause some stress, if you're not too far along IME it helps.

Guess it depends on the type of stress you're talking about.
 

Hick

Git "R" lit
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
12,836
Reaction score
12,667
I know... just another quote from 20 year old book. :rofl:..
BUT... in my 30 yrs of growing, I've yet to find a falacy. It speaks from science, with valid documentation, not from "I think".. or "I believe" .. or "I heard"..

There is really no confirmed method of forcing increased THC production. Many techniques have developed through misinterpretations of ancient tradition. In Colombia, farmers girdle the stalk of the main stem, which cuts off the flow of water and nutrients between the roots and the shoots. This technique may not raise the final THC level, but it does cause rapid maturation and yellow gold coloration in the floral cluster (Partridge 1973). Impaling with nails, pine splinters, balls of opium, and stones are clandestine folk methods of promoting flowering, taste and THC production. However none of these have any valid documentation from the original culture or scientific basis. Symbiotic relationships between herbs in companion plantings are known to influence the production of essential oils. Experiments might be carried out with different herbs, such as stinging nettles, as companion plants for Cannabis, in an effort to stimulate resin production. In the future, agricultural techniques may be discovered which specifically promote THC biosynthesis.
Many factors influence the production of THC. In general, the older a plant, the greater its potential to produce THC.
After that, the provision of adequate organic nutrients, water, sunlight, fresh air, growing space, and time for maturation seems to be the key to producing high-THC Cannabis in all circumstances.Stress resulting from inadequacies in the environment limits the true expression of phenotype and cannabinoid potential. Cannabis finds a normal adaptive defense in the production of THC laden resins, and it seems logical that a healthy plant is best able to raise this defense.Forcing plants to produce is a perverse ideal and alien to the principles of organic agriculture. Plants are not machines that can be worked faster and harder to produce more. The life processes of the plant rely on delicate natural balances aimed at the ultimate survival of the plant until it reproduces. The most a Cannabis cultivator or researcher can expect to do is provide all the requisites for healthy growth and guide the plant until it matures.
 

FUM

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
590
Reaction score
31
I found that info at www kindgreenbuds.com,marijuana grow guide. Good reading.
 

Hamster Lewis

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
16,529
Reaction score
3,731
Well we all know what stress can do to your plants....turn a she to a he. I wldnt even mess with this for a "small" increase in THC. Too riskynfor something that seems like an old wives tale to begin with. Jmo
 

Mutt

Just a Dawg
Joined
Jan 6, 2006
Messages
9,329
Reaction score
5,016
FUM said:
:icon_smile: I just read that stressing the plant gives bigger,fatter buds. But not to much. I'm looking for more info on this stressing during flowering issue plz.:icon_smile:
I've put plants through just about everything intentionally and accidentally. Nothing and I mean nothing beats a happy healthy well tended plant. Plain and simple.
Law of the minimum. When stressing the plant you are doing the opposite of what the plant needs and created a minimum. Stress causes a depletion in a plant. A plant can only produce as much as the minimum available nutrient can give. Plants get nutrients from light, medium, and air. A weak link is created when you stress which in essence will cause the plant to produce LESS not more.
hXXp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liebig%27s_Law_of_the_Minimum

but on a side note:
A stressed plant has no fan leaves (because they fell off dead) so I guess it would make the buds "look" bigger. ;)
 

Mutt

Just a Dawg
Joined
Jan 6, 2006
Messages
9,329
Reaction score
5,016
(1) plants must show alternating nodes before being sexually mature
I agree somewhat but this is a hard one to angle and argue. I have noticed if a plant switched early always had an alternating node on a branch or main stem or somewhere when it finally showed sex. Maybe a slight space but alternating just the same.
Now who is to say that there is NOT a pheno out there that never alternates. I think classifying it as a "sign" that it's mature is right and not misleading anyone. Just like pre-flowers is a "sign" it is sexually mature.

(2) product from plant grown 12/12 will be any less potent than plant grown otherwise.
I agree with that too. Heck some original landraces never see more then 14hrs a day. mainly 12/12 and a dip to maybe 10/14. Those are some of the most potent.
but in my experience in growing I have found that longer veg=bigger yield and more potency.
 

Hick

Git "R" lit
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
12,836
Reaction score
12,667
Mutt said:
I agree with that too. Heck some original landraces never see more then 14hrs a day. mainly 12/12 and a dip to maybe 10/14. Those are some of the most potent.
but in my experience in growing I have found that longer veg=bigger yield and more potency.
but... you're talking about 'landrace sativas'.. THAT is their natural environmental condition, the environment the have evolved into surviving/thriving in. A slightly different animal than 'landrace' indicas from outer latitudes.
....but I'm just regurgitating things I don't really know ....:D
Change in photoperiod is the factor that usually triggers the developmental stages of Cannabis. Photoperiod and seasonal cycles are determined by latitude. The most even photoperiods and mildest seasonal variations are found near the equator, and the most widely fluctuating photoperiods and most radical seasonal variations are found in polar and high altitude locations. Areas in intermediate latitudes show more pronounced seasonal variation depending on their distance from the equator or height in altitude.
The light cycle at 200 north latitude starts at the summer solstice when the photoperiod is just a little over 13 hours. This means that a long season exists that starts earlier and finishes later than at higher latitudes. However, because the photoperiod is never too long to induce flowering, Cannabis may also be grown in a short season from

December through March or April (90 to 120 days). Strains from these latitudes are often not as responsive to photoperiod change, and flowering seems strongly age-determined as well as light determined. Most strains of Cannabis will begin to flower when they are 60 days old if photoperiod does not exceed 13 hours. At 200 latitude, the photoperiod never exceeds 14 hours, and easily induced strains may begin flowering at nearly any time during the year.
Equatorial areas gain and lose daylength twice during the year as the sun passes north and south of the equator, resulting in two identical photoperiodic seasons.


Wild Cannabis occurs in many equatorial areas but it is of relatively low quality for fiber or drug production. Under cultivation, however, equatorial Cannabis has great potential for drug production.
 

bho_expertz

Aloha from ****
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
1,798
Reaction score
59
Runbyhemp said:
You'll enter a world where plants are sexually mature +/- 21 days, where it's not uncommon for pistils to show before alternating nodes and "copious" amounts of resin are produced from miniature plants. Resin, I might add that is in no way inferior to that of a plant which had a longer life cycle.
Sorry to jump here but i have to agree completely with this. In less that 30 days i have plants showned sex with veg time.

One example : Hammster Lewis with 1/2 gallon or 1 gallon having something like 50/60 gr per plants with 1000w. Clones i know but i strongly believe that with seeds is almost the same thing ... All my grows to date had 3 weeks of veg max. You DO NOT need to wait until preflowers/alternanting nodes to 12/12. With bigger plants less light penetrates to the plants unless you have some type of vertical setup.
I would like to have big plants if the yield was 500 gr ( 1lb ) per plant. For less then 100gr not worth IMO. But i'm completely illegal :shocked:. Same thing here if caugth with 1 or 20 plants.

I really hope that ppl stops giving the advice to wait until preflowers/alternanting nodes to change to 12/12 as if it was one of the Commandments.;) Lot's of things to see, like space size, lights, etc.
 
Joined
Aug 22, 2006
Messages
19,438
Reaction score
8,292
bho_expertz said:
....Clones i know but i strongly believe that with seeds is almost the same thing ....
Seeds are nothing like clones is this respect and IMO, cannot be compared. Clones are the same biological age as the mother they came from. Since most clones are taken later in vegging or early flowering, most are already 4 or more weeks old when you root them.
 
R

Roddy

Guest
Let me ask then, BHO, why bother with 24/7 light at all?

Maybe because most of us agree that less during veg results in stretch? You yourself said it sometimes takes a few weeks after switch and you said you veg for 3 weeks...3+2=normal maturity in many plants...like I suggested before. You even said it sometimes takes 3 weeks after flip....ALL my plants have shown maturity in 6 weeks, I'd bet the farm on that one. I believe you also admitted your plants stretch a bit during the flip to flower?

I am one to believe OPTIMAL conditions means waiting until mature...anything less is actually causing undue stress IMHO

I've put plants through just about everything intentionally and accidentally. Nothing and I mean nothing beats a happy healthy well tended plant. Plain and simple.
Law of the minimum. When stressing the plant you are doing the opposite of what the plant needs and created a minimum. Stress causes a depletion in a plant. A plant can only produce as much as the minimum available nutrient can give. Plants get nutrients from light, medium, and air. A weak link is created when you stress which in essence will cause the plant to produce LESS not more.
 
R

Roddy

Guest
And I agree there are exceptions to the "rule"...exceptions, not the norm. I personally will continue to advise waiting until maturity for OPTIMAL conditions....
 

bho_expertz

Aloha from ****
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
1,798
Reaction score
59
I don't want to enter in a battle Roddy but i said that it can take 3 weeks to show sex if the veg time was little or none ( the 21 days of Ruby). My plants with 3 weeks veg will take less then one week and a half to show sex, usually 4 days for males and 6/7 for females.
And of course they stretch they all do when 12/12. How could i wait to 6 weeks in a 4'x4' space with 23 plants ? And i don't see the change to 12/12 as stress. Do you ?

@THG - I see lot's of clones being made without knowing the sex of plant and after knowing the sex the males go to trash. That is not a Commandment also.
 
R

Roddy

Guest
My thought on this, switching early leaves the plant confused as to what it's supposed to do. This confusion is a source of stress...IMHO....undue stress.

I could be wrong, I often am, just seems reasonable to me.
 

Latest posts

Top