Submersible Pump

grodude

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The only thing that makes me feel like more of a newb than posting in this forum is asking this question. How do I install my submersible pump in my RDWC system. That's right, I asked it. I always thought it would be self explanatory when I got the pump. I always understood the farthest bucket from the reservoir connects to the pump, which run into my chiller and then into my res. There is a connection on top, but I don't see a connection from the side to connect it to my bucket. It seems to only sit in water and suck it out. Did I get the wrong pump? Can I connect an extra bucket at the end just for the pump to sit in? Thanks
 

Hushpuppy

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Most of the smaller submersible pumps don't have any kind of intake fitting on the pumps. the only fitting is on the output side so that you can connect a hose so that you can move the water to another location. The submersible pump is made to just sit in the bottom and suck in water through the intake, which is often covered with a ffilter screen. Some of the bigger pumps actually have an intake port that is threaded for a fitting to connect a hose so that the pump can be used externally rather than submerged. These are made to work either way. But it really depends on what you are wanting to do with the pump. If you are just circulating the solution through all of the totes/buckets that hold plants and connect to the main rez, then I would suggest that you use a standard submersible that is a low gpm. Then connect a small hose that is able to fit inside the pipes/hose that connects the buckets in the system. Place the pump in the last bucket in the series and push the output hose into the connection hose so that the water is pushed into the rez from the last bucket.

However if you are only using this pump to specifically run your solution over to the chiller, then I recommend that you do a separate pump that will pull water from the rez, to the chiller and then feed into the either the rez again or into the first plant bucket/tote so that the coolest water is distributed to the plants while the warmer water is pushed back into the rez.

BTW; don't feel bad or foolish asking about something that you don't know or are not sure about. If you need to know then there is no shame in asking. All of us started out not knowing what we know now. That is why we are here; to share our knowledge and experience with each other so that we all have better, more enjoyable results.
 

grodude

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Most of the smaller submersible pumps don't have any kind of intake fitting on the pumps. the only fitting is on the output side so that you can connect a hose so that you can move the water to another location. The submersible pump is made to just sit in the bottom and suck in water through the intake, which is often covered with a ffilter screen. Some of the bigger pumps actually have an intake port that is threaded for a fitting to connect a hose so that the pump can be used externally rather than submerged. These are made to work either way. But it really depends on what you are wanting to do with the pump. If you are just circulating the solution through all of the totes/buckets that hold plants and connect to the main rez, then I would suggest that you use a standard submersible that is a low gpm. Then connect a small hose that is able to fit inside the pipes/hose that connects the buckets in the system. Place the pump in the last bucket in the series and push the output hose into the connection hose so that the water is pushed into the rez from the last bucket.

However if you are only using this pump to specifically run your solution over to the chiller, then I recommend that you do a separate pump that will pull water from the rez, to the chiller and then feed into the either the rez again or into the first plant bucket/tote so that the coolest water is distributed to the plants while the warmer water is pushed back into the rez.

BTW; don't feel bad or foolish asking about something that you don't know or are not sure about. If you need to know then there is no shame in asking. All of us started out not knowing what we know now. That is why we are here; to share our knowledge and experience with each other so that we all have better, more enjoyable results.
Ideally I'd like to do everything with one pump. I was under the impression I could have one pump circulate the nutrients and go through the chiller. Is this not the case? When you say to put the pump the in the frathest bucket from the reservoir do you mean the one with a plant in it? Is that safe for the roots? Rather than doing that I was thinking of connecting a small extra bucket to the farthest bucket and have only the pump sit in that. Then I would go from the pump to the input of the chiller, and from the output to the reservoir. Would that work? I have a 1000GPH because that is what was recommended to be used with the chiller.

To try an understand something else you said. Did you say it's okay to put the pump in the reservoir, have it go to theinput of the chiller, and then the output of the chiller to the same reservoir? That will chill the water, but will it circulate it properly? Or do I need a second pump in that case going to the first bucket?

This is a picture of what I was intending on doing once I found out I bout a submersible pump instead of an inline pump, and am trying to avoid the hassle of exchanging or cost of buying an extra pump. Would this idea work? In case it isn't clear outside my 9X5 tent I have my chiller and reservoir. I have 2 27 gallon totes with 2 plants in each.

If I misunderstood anything you said please bare with me.

View attachment 20150214_134422.jpg
 

Hushpuppy

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There are several ways that you can do it. I suggested that you could pull from the reservoir to the chiller then back to the reservoir, but that would cause you to need a second pump to circulate the water.

You can place the pump in the reservoir and push the water directly to the chiller and then from the chiller to the first tote. This would do what you need for using just one pump for circulating the solution and adding in the chiller. You are simply just adding the chiller to the series ffor the water flow. You can have it flow just the opposite direction as well where the water from the last tote in line is pushed to the chiller and back to the reservoir.
I use my pump in my plant totes without root entanglement, but if you have 2 plants in each tote then there is the possibility for root entanglement. That is why you may be better to either put a empty tote/bucket inline ffor the pump as you said, or just put the pump in the reservoir and push the water ffrom the rez to the chiller first then output to the plant totes. Either way will work.

However,I am concerned for the size pump that you are using. A 1000gph pump is going to move a tremendous amount of water. I used a 140gph with my chiller system and I currently use a 100gph pump in my circulating hydro that is just like yours. I have 3 totes that are connected in series with my reservoir and the pump sits in the tote that is closest to the rez and pushes water to the rez (which can hold more water without flooding).
Iff your pump is too powerful and the connecting hoses/pipes in your RDWC are too small to allow a free enough flow, you will flood the first tote in the line from the pump. You should test this pump and the amount of flow that you will get from it before putting it into your system.
 

grodude

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There are several ways that you can do it. I suggested that you could pull from the reservoir to the chiller then back to the reservoir, but that would cause you to need a second pump to circulate the water.

You can place the pump in the reservoir and push the water directly to the chiller and then from the chiller to the first tote. This would do what you need for using just one pump for circulating the solution and adding in the chiller. You are simply just adding the chiller to the series ffor the water flow. You can have it flow just the opposite direction as well where the water from the last tote in line is pushed to the chiller and back to the reservoir.
I use my pump in my plant totes without root entanglement, but if you have 2 plants in each tote then there is the possibility for root entanglement. That is why you may be better to either put a empty tote/bucket inline ffor the pump as you said, or just put the pump in the reservoir and push the water ffrom the rez to the chiller first then output to the plant totes. Either way will work.

However,I am concerned for the size pump that you are using. A 1000gph pump is going to move a tremendous amount of water. I used a 140gph with my chiller system and I currently use a 100gph pump in my circulating hydro that is just like yours. I have 3 totes that are connected in series with my reservoir and the pump sits in the tote that is closest to the rez and pushes water to the rez (which can hold more water without flooding).
Iff your pump is too powerful and the connecting hoses/pipes in your RDWC are too small to allow a free enough flow, you will flood the first tote in the line from the pump. You should test this pump and the amount of flow that you will get from it before putting it into your system.
the only reason I got a thousand gallons per hour pump is because that is what was recommended for the chiller. I thought that I would need to have that much water going through in order to properly cool the water, but if that is not the case I would love to return it and get a cheaper pump
 

Hushpuppy

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The chillers that I have seen (and the one that I used to have) had a range of pump gph that could be used to attain a given temperature of the output water. If your chiller is small then you want a pump that will move the water slower through the chiller so that it has time to cool the water as it passes through. Having a high gph pump will either cause too much pressure or move the water too fast to properly cool it. Given the size of your grow, I wouldn't think you would need a pump that moves more than 100-150gph.

See if you can find the information in the manual ffor the chiller that gives you the range off pumps to achieve certain temps. If you can, take a pic and post it here so we can see it. Also the size of the hose/pipe that feeds the chiller makes a difference in what pump you use, but the manual should give you something on that as well.
 
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