Contact relay switch with 250W HPS lamp and timer

ActivatedAlmonds52

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I've read this:


You could go to your local Hydro shop and buy a contactor all built and ready to go along with a hefty price tag. Or you can get yourself a suitable change over Contact Relay switch, this will only set you back a few $$ ££. A contact relay switch is required so that the timer turns on the contactor which then turns the light on. Household timers are rated for a RESISTIVE load, ballasts present an INDUCTIVE load, (a very large surge at switch on) this fuses the timer contacts together = Timer failure.

So the takeway is that I need a contact relay switch to avoid frying my lamp timer. Three questions:

- do they all look like this (box with outlets and a plug)?



- should I connect everything like this? Wall outlet -> power strip -> timer -> contact relay switch (or timer WITH C.R.S., like in the picture above) -> 250W ballast

- I live in Europe. My breakers are rated 20A, 230/400V. I guess this should be good enough, but can anyone recommend a CRS that's good for a 250W HPS and not 6x600W? I sure as hell don't need that much power.
 

CrashMagnet

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Are they still using inductive ballasts with HPS lights? I haven't looked, but I would expect to see more efficient electronic or digital ballasts today. Those should work with the same cheap timers everyone uses with LED lights.
 

RosterMan

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Why dont you use a comericial time clock 220 volt .They can handle a load .How many lites are you running?
Agree
I have used these for many years , never a missed light time on or off.
1668695670633.png
 

Weedy

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A 'whatever' 220v timer will sure do the job, if you are on 250W . I = P/U . I = 250/220 = 1.2A it is way less than a 20A fuse.
There is a power peak on consumption when the HPS light switches on, but no prob for any nowadays timer. Some cheap will die after 1/2 years, some will never die. I'd say.
Usually a 'mecanical' 220v timer can hold 16A wich is equal to up to 3520W (you can practice with the formula P = U x I to better understand the link between I (intensity in amp) and P (power in watt) with U at 220V).
 

joeb631a

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As a electrician i used intermattic time clocks at 110 and 220 volt applications .
they are rated for 40 amps .
With multilabel lites we used multilabel time clocks that came on with 5 minutes of each other
 

ActivatedAlmonds52

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Are they still using inductive ballasts with HPS lights? I haven't looked, but I would expect to see more efficient electronic or digital ballasts today. Those should work with the same cheap timers everyone uses with LED lights.

The thread I quoted is pretty old, so maybe I don't need a contact relay switch?

I should've been more specific. I'm thinking of getting this one:


I only want to use a single 250W lamp.
 

CrashMagnet

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The thread I quoted is pretty old, so maybe I don't need a contact relay switch?

I should've been more specific. I'm thinking of getting this one:


I only want to use a single 250W lamp.
I think any old timer will be fine with this.
 

joeb631a

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The thread I quoted is pretty old, so maybe I don't need a contact relay switch?

I should've been more specific. I'm thinking of getting this one:


I only want to use a single 250W lamp.
Easily at 230 volt the amperage is small
any timer should do fine
 

Weedy

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The link you gave is for an electronic ballast. And it looks nice. Maybe we misunderstood your question?
You need a ballast - which is mainly a condensator for your HPS/MH to be able to light up the gaz within the bulb - and you need a timer to switch on/off your light automatically.
So your pretty right, the path should be : Wall outlet -> power strip -> timer -> 250W ballast
As we all say, choose a simple 220v timer, it is cheap and good. example: Grow1 240V Single Outlet Mechanical Timer
Do not forget to add fan(s), depending on your night temperatures it could be Wall outlet -> timer -> power strip -> 250W ballast + day fan(s)
 

Bubba

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Are they still using inductive ballasts with HPS lights? I haven't looked, but I would expect to see more efficient electronic or digital ballasts today. Those should work with the same cheap timers everyone uses with LED lights.
Yes they have digital ones. Many are cheapo Chinese units, some high quality. The older ones are still around, I have a modern one, weighs like an anchor and gets hot enough I put a small fan on it. Also have modern digital versions, get a good one.

Bubba
 

ActivatedAlmonds52

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Thanks for the replies, guys. It seems that I simply used an outdated source of information as reference.

I'm really glad I won't have to get another part for my setup and worry about frying anything!
 

Bubba

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Why dont you use a comericial time clock 220 volt .They can handle a load .How many lites are you running?
I never thought of that. Its just a timer, so 220 volt version would work for 120, only difference is, its a heavier made unit, right? No circuit in a timer that requires 220 volt so why not? Just never occurred to me.

Bubba
 

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