Is she dying?

Discussion in 'General Outdoor Growing' started by BamBam15, Sep 10, 2019.

  1. Sep 10, 2019 #1

    BamBam15

    BamBam15

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    1st time grower. I’m a ditch weed gal so I’m not sure of the strain. Everything was superb until two days ago when I woke up and saw my beautiful girl wilting away, as of now she is for sure a cancer patient. She’s in flowering stage and needs all the advice to save her life.

    The 2nd Pic is the day all **** broke loose.
     

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  2. Sep 10, 2019 #2

    oldfogey8

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    Did you have a frost or really cool temps? Looks like she is a goner...
    Sorry.
     
  3. Sep 10, 2019 #3

    Rosebud

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    give her a drink.
     
  4. Sep 10, 2019 #4

    key2life

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    I'm with Rose - flush her out real good and let her drink. Maybe put in open shade area out of the sun until she rebounds a little.
     
  5. Sep 10, 2019 #5

    BamBam15

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    I live coastal Georgia where humidity is crazy high. Could this be root rot? If so can I take what buds have formed and smoke away?
     
  6. Sep 10, 2019 #6

    stinkyattic

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    Unless you know for sure that the pot got completely dried out and was very light when you took the wilty pic- that does look more like rootrot to me. Google weather has your overnight lows WELL out of frost range, though a killing frost would cause the same visual issue. Get all those blackened leaves away from the buds right away. Leave any leaves that are still mostly green and perky. You might be able to limp her a couple more days but with your local humidity being what it is, be on the lookout for black/powdery patches on the buds. If you are using pots with built in drip pans, don't use them next year. They don't allow good air circulation, and can harbor the larvae of fungus gnats which will destroy roots and spread disease.
    When you harvest, give the muck (I suspect you will find muck!) in the bottom a good sniff. I'll bet it smells like a swamp, if it was rot : (
    Yes you can dry and smoke unfinished buds but it will be a fast not ideal high with a crashy comedown. Fine to cook with if you get them to a high enough temperature though.
     
  7. Sep 11, 2019 #7

    Eyeball Kid

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    I'd go with your assessment. It can't be a killing frost in coastal Georgia. It's too much water and/or not enough drainage that must have brought on the rot. In that climate, I'd venture a guess that sativa strains are most applicable. Heavier indicas would be prone to rot due to the humidity. They're typically a plant with thicker colas. But you've got a different problem anyway because your large leaves are wilting.
     
  8. Sep 12, 2019 #8

    stinkyattic

    stinkyattic

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    Cola size isn't a direct correlation with root rot. There are plenty of indica lines that are resistant to both foliar fungi and rootzone fungi; or more to the point, resistant to the larvae and/or nematodes that tend to infest poorly drained soils.
    For the same reason that Rosa cultivars are grafted onto rootstocks known to thrive in the area where the plants will be sold, outdoor cannabis growers with known soggy soil have options for strains that are okay with wet feet.
    Growing in containers in wet areas is a common solution, as the OP has done.
    Unfortunately we are sold 2 in 1 pots plus saucers as the greatest thing to save the paint on the deck. Which is totally legit; I have a nice porch and care about it, I get it.
    That being said, there's a huge benefit in controlling how much the dirt in the bottom of the pot dries out, which means being able to pull the saucer for a few days here n there.
    Nursery pots have those big holes for a reason and this is it.
    Plant size, strain choice, fertilizer routine - up to you, and there are so many right ways to do it. But good drainage in the pot will make or break a grow season.
    It's simply a matter of seeing the problem, and planning a workaround. I'm sure you will do fine next year. The plant got to a nice size before the damage pics, so you are on the right track!
     

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