NEW Meter - Hanna Grochek pH EC TDS Conductivity Tester Meter

Pepper

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Was told to spend a litle more $ on a meter and get an all in one ph & ppm continuous meter, etc, found this one at a decent price. You guys have experiance with this meter? Good? Bad?



METER.jpg
  • Rugged Watertight Casing.
  • Temperature in °C and °F.
  • EC (Electrical Conductivity) in micro siemens
  • TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) in ppm
  • Measurement Stability Indicator.
  • Replaceable pH Electrode.
  • Automatic pH Calibration at standard and NIST Buffer Sets.
  • Automatic Temperature Compensation (ATC).
  • Adjustable Temperature Coefficient Factor.
HI 991404 is designed for continuous, high accuracy pH, EC/TDS and temperature measurements. This microprocessor indicator continuously monitors the three most important nutrient parameters in hydroponics, greenhouses and horticultural applications with a single instrument and features a large, dual-level, back-lit LCD to give you continuous readings of pH, EC or TDS and temperature even from a distance.
At startup, a self-check assures proper working condition. The HI991404 has a stability indicator and hold feature to prompt the user when to take the reading and freezes the display for easy and accurate recording. Calibration and temperature compensation is automatic, while the EC/TDS conversion factor and temperature coefficient (ß) are both user adjustable for application-specific measurements. This instrument is supplied with an advanced, non-clogging double junction pH electrode and a rugged conductivity probe that will withstand even the most aggressive environments. The power source is a 12 volt DC transformer. A 220V version is available at no extra charge, for use outside the US, but you must specify this option at time of purchase. Easy installation and use make it ideal for all continuous monitoring applications.
The HI991404 comes complete with an HI 1293D pH electrode, HI 7630 EC/TDS/temp. probe (fixed), 12 VDC adapter, packets of pH4 & pH7 buffers (20 mL each) & 1413 µS/cm EC solution and instructions.



RangeEC0 to 3999 µS/cm
TDS0 to 2000 ppm
pH0.0 to 14.0 pH
Temperature0.0 to 60.0 °C or 32.0 to 140.0 °F
ResolutionEC1 µS/cm
TDS1 ppm
pH
0.1

Temperature0.1 °C or 0.1 °F
Accuracy (@ 20°C/68°F)EC/TDS±2% Full Scale pH±0.1 Temperature±0.5 °C or ±1 °F
Typical EMC DeviationEC/TDS±2% Full Scale
pH±0.1 Temperature±1 °C or ±2 °FCalibrationEC/TDSAutomatic at 1 point pH1 or 2 points with 2 sets of memorized buffersTemperature CompensationEC/TDSBETA (ß) = adjustable from 0.0 to 2.4 per °C in increments of 0.1 pHAutomaticEC / TDS Conversion Factor Adjustable from 0.45 to 1.00
Environment 0 to 50°C (32 to 122°F)
Power Supply External 12 VDC (included)
Dimensions 165 x 110 x 35 mm (6.5 x 4.3 x 1.3")
Weight 300 g (10.6 oz.)
 

D3

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Hanna makes good stuff. I use a BlueLab Combo Meter. The two are very similar. I think the BlueLab is a little eaiser to use. Did you get some calibration solution?
 

Pepper

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Thanks. No haven't bought anything yet, on an extremely tight budget so can not afford to buy meters/solution all the time, it must be a 1 shot deal only and it must last a very loooonnnnggggggg time. Not sure on what to buy :confused: :hairpull:

Been told that these meters dont last to long :eek: dont want to buy more then 1 time, not spending 25 or 150 bucks on meters every 6 months. May end up just buying the paper test kits for 5 or 10 bucks and they will last a loooonnnnnnngggg time, or just wing it with no meters and hope it all works out well. Grew up in a farm so growing veggies and fruit is nothing new, and never tested anything, just used the naked eye and knew what the plants needed.
 

scatking

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IMO you are better off with spending less on a meter and more on lighting. This is a top notch unit, but is probably overkill if your grows are for personal use. I'm not saying to buy a cheap metering equipment, but don't use a sledge hammer to drive a finishing nail....
 

solarz

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i have that same exact meter, and IMHO i would send it back. Now i have VERY good reason for saying this and i will detail it below. Now i will advise you to take this with a grain of salt, as this is only MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE with this meter.

1. It NEVER stays calibrated...and with you not having any solution, i wouldn't even plug this bad boy up...because that little packet that comes with it isn't going to cut it.

2. It takes FOREVER for the thing to ever stabilize on a specific reading, and i'm talking over 15-30 mins.

3. You can't submerge the entire probe into the water, forcing you to hold steady the entire time you are waiting for it to stabilize on a reading (see #2). They(hanna) recommends constructing something that allows the probe to float at a specific level in the resevior.

4. This is a CONTINUOUS meter, therefore, it is BEST that both probes stay in some form of liquid at all times. Now, you can store the ph probe with the calibration solution in the cap, but that leaves the ec/temp probe dry. And i've learned that you need both of these spot on in order to get it to calibrate, as well produce accurate readings.

I all honesty, i would sent that back, and opt for 2 separate meters...one for just ph and another for ec/ppm. Like i said before, this is just my honest opinion, but like someone mentioned earlier...for personal grows, this is a little too intricate/detailed for what its worth.

solarz
 
J

JBonez

Guest
you really should get the hanna cal-check meter.

I do a two point calibration on it.

Stabilizes fast (after youve used it a while or at least during testing)

The storage, cleaning, buffers, and associated solutions are expensive, but i love it!

ppm/ec @ .5 conversion, this is the only thing that bums me out, i wish it was at a .7 conversion.

Been thinking about a blue lab truncheon for quick readings.

overall its a good meter, but there is a little maintenance involved.

GroChekpH-EC-TDS-C%20Meter%20w-Cal-Check.jpg
 
4

420MED

Guest
I have this meter as well and its pretty nice. Do you store your probe any special way?
 
J

JBonez

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420MED said:
I have this meter as well and its pretty nice. Do you store your probe any special way?

i keep the cap fill with storage solution when im not using the meter and periodically i clean and calibrate it.
 

Pepper

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Winging it with no meter. Boiling tap water letting it sit for 24hrs adding nuts letting it sit another 48hrs with an airstone, then add plants, so far so good have no idea what the ph is but plants are looking good so far.
 
J

JBonez

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so far, as nutrients accumulate in the soil, your ph will need to be higher and higher, usually, i just cant see growing kind bud without keeping the ph in check, jmo.
 

Pepper

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JBonez said:
so far, as nutrients accumulate in the soil, your ph will need to be higher and higher, usually, i just cant see growing kind bud without keeping the ph in check, jmo.




Not in soil but in a dwc system. Plants get flushed every 2 weeks for 24hrs in boiled plain tap water, water is boiled then let settle for 48 hrs with an airstone then replace containers.

Nuts in system get changed every 2 wks so between nute changes the plants are flushed.
 

smokeytimes

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After all the negitive comments I read about the Hanna combo's and getting them calibrated I went with two Milwakee pens PH51 and T75 and I really like them as there fast to stablize and seems to be pretty acurate. I spent like $75 on each. I might have been robbed at the hydro store though.
 
J

JBonez

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boiling water increases tds, unless your distilling it, then i could see it making sense.
 
B

BuddyLuv

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I agree with JBonez. I have the same meter and love it. I calibrate it once a month and it usually only need the TDS/EC set back a few points. The pH is usually still dead on, I have three resevoirs I check everyday and the only thing that needed to be replaced so far was the batteries.
 

Pepper

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smokeytimes said:
After all the negitive comments I read about the Hanna combo's and getting them calibrated I went with two Milwakee pens PH51 and T75 and I really like them as there fast to stablize and seems to be pretty acurate. I spent like $75 on each. I might have been robbed at the hydro store though.


Thanks, will check them out.
 

Pepper

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JBonez said:
boiling water increases tds, unless your distilling it, then i could see it making sense.


Sorry for my ignorance but what does tds mean? How do you distill boiled water?
 

Pepper

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BuddyLuv said:
I agree with JBonez. I have the same meter and love it. I calibrate it once a month and it usually only need the TDS/EC set back a few points. The pH is usually still dead on, I have three resevoirs I check everyday and the only thing that needed to be replaced so far was the batteries.


Thanks
 

smokeytimes

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This is from Wikipedia
Total dissolved solids
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bottled mineral water usually contains higher TDS levels than tap waterTotal Dissolved Solids (often abbreviated TDS) is an expression for the combined content of all inorganic and organic substances contained in a liquid which are present in a molecular, ionized or micro-granular (colloidal sol) suspended form. Generally the operational definition is that the solids must be small enough to survive filtration through a sieve size of two micrometres. Total dissolved solids are normally only discussed for freshwater systems, since salinity comprises some of the ions constituting the definition of TDS. The principal application of TDS is in the study of water quality for streams, rivers and lakes, although TDS is generally considered not as a primary pollutant (e.g. it is not deemed to be associated with health effects), but it is rather used as an indication of aesthetic characteristics of drinking water and as an aggregate indicator of presence of a broad array of chemical contaminants.

Primary sources for TDS in receiving waters are agricultural runoff, leaching of soil contamination and point source water pollution discharge from industrial or sewage treatment plants. The most common chemical constituents are calcium, phosphates, nitrates, sodium, potassium and chloride, which are found in nutrient runoff, general stormwater runoff and runoff from snowy climates where road de-icing salts are applied. The chemicals may be cations, anions, molecules or agglomerations on the order of 1000 or fewer molecules, so long as a soluble micro-granule is formed. More exotic and harmful elements of TDS are pesticides arising from surface runoff. Certain naturally occurring total dissolved solids arise from the weathering and dissolution of rocks and soils. The United States has established a secondary water quality standard of 500 mg/l to provide for palatability of drinking water.

Total dissolved solids are differentiated from total suspended solids (TSS), in that the latter cannot pass through a sieve of two micrometres and yet are indefinitely suspended in solution. The term "settleable solids" refers to material of any size that will not remain suspended or dissolved in a holding tank not subject to motion, and exclude both TDS and TSS.[1] Settleable solids may include larger particulate matter or insoluble molecules.
 

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