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Questionable russet weed

Seattle Bong Ripper

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During harvest today I was removing brown buds effected with russets. The grower didn't want to keep anything close to the russet weed, so I ended up taking off a few inches gap of green weed that acted as a barrier between the brown trash buds and the keepers.

To clarify, the buds were brown and wispy at the bottom of a branch, but faded away into good green nugs at the top of the branch. I trashed anything brown, then removed a few inches of greener buds, then he kept the top.

I was allowed to keep the greener "barrier" buds. My question to you all is: is this weed good to smoke? Its green, but not as, I'd say, vibrant looking as unaffected buds. Seemed fine to me

Thanks!
 

WeedHopper

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You lost me. The pistols are brown doesn't mean bad to me. Gray or black means bad but red or browning doesnt mean bad. Maybe im missing what your trying to explain.
Have you looked at the trichs? And what the **** is barrier buds?😳
Are you talking about weed infested with Russet Mites? If so i would think if its that bad your whole plant would me infested. And yes that would be bad.
 
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Seattle Bong Ripper

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You lost me. The pistols are brown doesn't mean bad to me. Gray or black means bad but red or browning doesnt mean bad. Maybe im missing what your trying to explain.
Have you looked at the trichs? And what the **** is barrier buds?😳
Are you talking about weed infested with Russet Mites? If so i would think if its that bad your whole plant would me infested. And yes that would be bad.
Sorry maybe I wasn't clear. So the bottom third of the plant was brown and wispy(he said from russet mites). The top third of the plant was green and perfect. The middle third of the plant was where the bud was green, but not as bright green. A few plants had this. I took buds from that middle section of the plants (the "barrier" section if that makes sense), in between the brown stuff on the bottom and the green stuff on top. The buds I have are green with red hairs. I broke buds in half to make sure they were green inside, and they were
 

WeedHopper

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You can bet your ass the rest of that weed has mites. If they have destroyed the lower third of the plant that badly,,,they have already infested the rest of that plant and any other plants near it. They are very hard to see but their damage is not. Look under all the leaves with a magnifying glass.
Edited,,no webbing.😒
 
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Seattle Bong Ripper

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You can bet your ass the rest of that weed has mites. If they have destroyed the lower third of the plant that badly,,,they have already infested the rest of that plant and any other plants near it. They are very hard to see but their damage is not. Look under all the leaves with a magnifying glass. Look for tiny little spiders and small webbs.
Well these are suspected russet mites, not spider mites. There is no webbing or spiders, just brown wispy lower buds
 

WeedHopper

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Okay,,so no webb,,but the damage is just as bad..Smoke away. Enjoy the snap crackle and pop.😁
 
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WeedHopper

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Russet Mites
Russet Mites, along with Hemp Russet Mites, are some of the most damaging and difficult to control pests affecting growers today. Many species are host-specific and prefer monocultured growing areas (tomato growers in particular). Hard to spot and quick to reproduce, russet mites do not produce the noticeable webbing that identifies spider mites. Members of the Eriophyidae family of mites, they typically move in without being noticed and can build a large population before damage symptoms are evident. Their minute size allows them to hitch rides to new areas on clothing, in removed debris and even on other pest insects like whiteflies and aphids making sanitation imperative in infested areas. Warm, dry, windless conditions encourage mite populations to grow more rapidly, but they will target plant growth where conditions provide shelter and humidity.

Life Cycle & Appearance:

Russet mites lay clear, round eggs in the spring. Following the egg's hatching, russet mites go through two developmental nymph stages, which resemble adults. Developmental time varies from 8-15 days based on environmental conditions. Adults are tiny and wedge-shaped, appearing yellow when clustered. They differ from many other mite species in that they only have two pairs of legs. Females overwinter inside the stems of affected plants as well as at plant joints.

Damage:

Russet mite damage usually presents itself at the bottom of the plant and moves upwards as the mite population does. It begins with yellowing leaves (chlorosis) and leaf curl ("taco-ing"), which is often mistaken for a nutrient or water deficiency. Continued russet mite damage will reduce the plant's vigor, overall health, new growth and flowering making control all the more important.
Once a population is established the mites will move onto all parts of the plant including flowers and blossoms. Over time, russet mite feeding has a severe impact on bud and flower production throughout a grow making preventative control and early treatment the most economically viable treatment methods.
 

ROSTERMAN

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The herbicides were way worse than any mites, make hash or tinctures
 

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