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Skinny leaves

Flyinghigh

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Man my 1 plant started to have problem and the leaves are turning skinny and about to cut it down and it a she.!
My ph is 6.5
Happy Frog soil
F.F food trio
It about 16 inch tall.!
400 watt mh 18/6
What can I do flush it to fix.?
 

OGKushman

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Sounds like a virus or a bacteria of some sort. Can you describe more? Is it spiraling? Or is it lime colored? Or bright green? Really dark green? How often do you feed? 6.5 seems high for soil. Id aim closer to 6.0.
 

Flyinghigh

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I'll get a picture of it later and for ur question I have curl leaves and it light green, lighter then my others and feed all at the same time and has purple stem at the big fan leaves.
Temp is about 90 but don't feel like it. Open door some.!

I am thinking it my need more n in it feed.
 

OGKushman

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this sounds possibly like heat stress and low humidity...

PLANT MOISTURE STRESS - symptoms and solutions (revised Jan. 12, 2009)

Quite often I hear groans from folks having leaf problems -> “Help, my leaves are cupping and the leaf edges are turning brown!”, or, “My plant's leaf tips are curling down and turning black ....what's wrong?” Unless insect damage has occurred or the plant is suffering from a severe case of calcium deficiency, the plant is trying to tell you that it is water stressed. It's hard to tell *exactly* what the culprit is, and unfortunately the “solution” the grower chooses many times is not the right one. A mis-diagnosis only serves to make matters worse by promoting further decline. I’ll try to cover some of the more common causes that can induce these common symptoms and try to offer a few simple solutions. The ultimate and correct solution is in the hands of the grower.

1. Over-fertilizing - the most common cause of leaf cupping aka leaf margin rolling, leaf margin burn, and leaf tip curl/burn is the overzealous use of too much plant food in relationship to factors such as plant size, vigor and rate of growth. The first unit of a plant to show moisture stress is the leaf at its margins and/or tips, reflected by margin rolling (cupping) or burning. Sometimes copper colored necrotic spots show in the leaf also. A hard, crispy feel to the leaf frequently occurs as well, as opposed to a soft and cool feel of a happy leaf. When you have a high concentration of salts in solution (or in the root medium) compared to lower salinity levels found in the plant’s tissue, water is actually drawn out of the plant across the root gradient in order to fix the ppm imbalance. IOW, this is a natural, osmotic response that serves to equalize salinity levels on both sides of the root’s epidermal gradient. Back off on the amount and/or frequency of plant food. Too much plant food can also burn the roots, especially the sensitive root tips and hairs, which then creates another set of problems such as nutrient deficiencies. A note for the bio folks - as soil dries, the concentration of the remaining salts rises further exacerbating the problem. Leach (flush) your pots once in a while to get rid of excess salts.

2. High Heat - the plant is losing water via it’s leaves faster than what can be replaced by the root system. The leaf responds by leaf margin cupping or rolling (up or down) in order to conserve moisture. A good example is reflected by the appearance of broad-bladed turf grass on a hot summer day, high noon, with low soil moisture levels - the leaf blade will roll in and the grass will take on a dull, greyish-green appearance. Upon sunrise when moisture levels have returned to normal, the leaf blade will be flat. Lower the heat and concentrate on developing a large, robust root system by practicing sound plant culture. An efficient and effective root system will go a long way to prevent heat induced leaf dessication and leaf margin curling by supplying sufficient moisture for good plant health. One short episode of high heat is enough to permanently destroy leaf tissue and cause a general decline in the leaves affected, which often occurs to leaves found at the top of the plant located near HID lamps. The damaged leaf (usually) does not recover, no matter what you do. Bummer in the summer. One can only look to new growth for indications that the problem has been corrected.

3. High Light - yes, it’s true, you can give our faves too much light. Cannabis does not receive full sun from sunrise to sunset in its natural state. It is shaded or given reduced light levels because of adjacent plant material, cloudy conditions, rain, debris and dust collection on the leaf surface, twilight periods of early morning and late afternoon, and light intensity changes caused by a change in the seasons. Too much light mainly serves to bleach out and destroy chlorophyll as opposed to causing leaf cupping, but it often goes hand-in-hand with high heat for indoor growers. Again, back off on the light and concentrate on developing/maintaining an efficient and robust root system. Keep in mind that all but equatorial material receive less light during flowering than during the vegetative stage.

4. Overwatering - this practice only serves to weaken the root system by depriving the roots of proper gas exchange. IOW, the roots are not getting enough oxygen which creates an anerobic condition causing root decline and root rot with the end result showing up as leaf stress, stunted growth, and in severe cases, death. <gasp!> Alot of times folks think the plant is not getting enough plant food (which it can't under such adverse conditions), they add more nutes for a "curative", and just add insult to injury.

5. Underwatering - not only is the plant now stressed due to a low supply of adequate moisture, but carbohydrate production has been greatly compromised (screwed up). Step up the watering frequency, and if need be, organic growers may need to soak the pot from the bottom up until moisture levels reach an even consistency throughout the medium especially with mixes that are heavy in peat. If severe, a little surfactant (liquid Ivory dish soap) added to the drench will help return the organics back to a normal moisture retentive state. If the pot feels light to the lift - it&#8217;s time to water. Don&#8217;t wait until the soil pulls away from the sides of the pot or leaves droop before you water.
Copied from another forum*
 

Coho

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How big is the pot it's in? Pic please.
 

Flyinghigh

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It is in 3 gal pot and yea it stretched some and the end when finish will be Light and fluffy, that if I keep.!
I am starting not having fun right Now with these plants.. My other plants are doing fine. the ones with the white x came from a buddy that didn't want to grow inside, because he don't want to run his electric up, but the others are doing Good to me...

mmj 013.jpg


mmj 014.jpg
 

OGKushman

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Those are under a 400w mh??????

I think your bulb is bad or too far away! They look very underlit. And your ph i think is too high. Some leaves are "clawing" which is a sign of over feeding and/or watering.
 

Hushpuppy

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One problem I see is that they are stretched bad from a lack of lumens. I assume yer friend didn't have them in ideal conditions.

Hey OGK, I thought in soil the PH should be right around 7.0. I run hydro and I keep my PH between 5.8-6.2. I suspect that if his PH is running 6.5 then he is locking out some of the macro nutes and that is causing the "spindly" growth.
 

Hushpuppy

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Hey Flyinghigh; check out the first 2 stickies at the top of this thread and read through them carefully as they will tell you a lot of good info for looking at the plants and comparing what you can see to what they are saying for deficiencies and nute lock and such. :)
 

OGKushman

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No hush, you want to start at 5.3 in hydro and let it drift to 6.2 MAX. This allows uptake of Mn. the drift thru the ph scale lets it pick up "full range".

In soil you want to start at ~6.1 and don't let it drift much above 6.7.

Nutrient_Chart2470.png
 

Wetdog

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OGKushman said:
Sounds like a virus or a bacteria of some sort. Can you describe more? Is it spiraling? Or is it lime colored? Or bright green? Really dark green? How often do you feed? 6.5 seems high for soil. Id aim closer to 6.0.
6.5 is perfect for soil, pretty much anything from 6.3-7.0 is fine in soil.

Wet
 

Growdude

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I would bend all of them over then lower the light.
That will beef them up.
 

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