leaf-deficiency-chart-

Discussion in 'Sick Plants & Problems' started by ozzydiodude, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. Jan 31, 2018 #41

    sopappy

    sopappy

    sopappy

    Well-Known Member

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    Holy crap, 2016. I had to scramble to save my business and let all this slide.
    more than a year, tempus fugit
    My apologies, 13.... I missed this
    LEDS must be 6 years old now, yes 375 real watts, still suck, in fact 2 modules died
    I know they want more light, they stretch
    I want that Spyder thing on a rail
     
  2. May 8, 2018 #42

    Ian1995420

    Ian1995420

    Ian1995420

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    After transplant shock what do I do I need some help
     

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  3. May 16, 2018 at 3:13 PM #43

    Hushpuppy

    Hushpuppy

    Hushpuppy

    Dr MadBud Staff Member Admin

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    With transplant shock there is nothing you can do to help other than to keep the soil moist but not soaking wet. What has happened is that you damaged some of the smaller roots when you transplanted. It will take a some time for the plant to recover. You can help them recover a little faster (if they are drooping) by spraying them with a mist of water and a very light solution of nutes. They can absorb water and nutes through the leaves. I do this with all my cuttings. As soon as I take and set cuttings, I begin spraying them 2x daily so that they don't dry out from not being able to draw up water. Once they show new growth beginning, I start cutting back the spray to encourage the roots to take over.
     
  4. May 16, 2018 at 3:18 PM #44

    Hushpuppy

    Hushpuppy

    Hushpuppy

    Dr MadBud Staff Member Admin

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    One way I work to prevent transplant shock (that seems to work quite well for me) is to let my plants dry out in their smaller container. Just before they begin to droop, I transplant. I do this because the roots and medium draw in some, which makes it easier to release them from the containers (I use solo cups for early stage growth of both seedlings and cuttings). I then gently place them in new pots and cover with fresh soil that is already damp. I lightly tamp the new soil to pack it down just a little, then I thoroughly wet the soil so that the roots will be encouraged to reach out into the new soil. I rarely have any transplant issues doing it this way.
     

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