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question for the brains out there

mountain rambler

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Hey all

So, I've been doing research on all the pests, etc. you outdoor growers need to deal with, and I have decided to expand my grow to the outside this season (in a normal fashion :D ).

I was planning on starting inside, then working from clones. BUT I read somewhere that if you start too early inside you can actually decrease your yield?? I can't find the darned post now (have been looking forever), and I was wondering is this true? I can see how someone who's never grown before would think it would make harvest sooner, and that can't be true-- I know that-- but how could it affect yield negatively? What am I missing here?

Thanks!
 

Hick

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My sugestion...
Veg them under 16/8 if they're going OD. It will allow them to make the ID/OD transition easier. The only reason that I can think wold cause a yeild loss, would be them going into flower, too early, then revegging, then reflowering. Which sometimes will happen, if not raised on the proper light cycle.
If they are vegged on 24 lite, the transition to OD early on, can trigger flowering
 
S

Stoney Bud

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Hick said:
My suggestion...
Veg them under 16/8 if they're going OD. It will allow them to make the ID/OD transition easier. The only reason that I can think wold cause a yield loss, would be them going into flower, too early, then re vegging, then re flowering. Which sometimes will happen, if not raised on the proper light cycle.
If they are vegged on 24 lite, the transition to OD early on, can trigger flowering
Great advice! If you can also acclimate the plants to the outside ambient conditions by introducing them gradually to the change, it would help them produce properly. The difference in light intensity is the most drastic change the plants will have to adapt to.

If you can safely do so, take them outside for only an hour per/day for several days and then move the time up to slightly more each day until the plants have become accustomed to the light intensity. Usually they adjust within a week. Watch your watering carefully. Their need for water may initially decrease because of a slight shock, but then will increase because of the increase in transpiration caused by the light intensity increase. I would also initially decrease your nutrient strength until all signs of shock are over and then increase them to an amount appropriate for an outside plant. When you transplant into the ground, make sure you prep the ground properly to reduce the amount of transplant shock.

Moving from inside to outside is something many growers don't fully understand. Plants acclimate themselves to their environment. If you alter that environment drastically, the plant may react in unfavorable ways.

Good luck to you in moving the plants, and watch out for leo. You're in leo's world out there.

After growing inside for so many years using Hydro, I can't fathom why anyone would want to go back outside with their babies. They love it inside. Leo hates it when you grow inside. He can't watch.
 

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