SubGirl’s Garden

SubmarineGirl

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I have gotten rid of thrips and mites in my garden with nothing more than a garden hose and spray handle set on flat spray. I blast the fkers off from underneath. I do that everyday for a week and then once every couple days for another week. And they are gone. I dont like using Pesticides but to each his own.
Mine are strapped down hard in the tent
 

WeedHopper

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Sorry Sub. I keep forgetting your growing inside. 🤪
When i was growing inside i used a water bottle sprayer with Water, Alcohol, and a little dish soap mix to kill Mites. Sometimes i also added Garlic.
Kills them on contact and they dont like the taste either. 😁 Just keep your alcohol at about a 30% mix. Let it set for about 30mins and then spray it off with fresh water.
 
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RosterMan

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Sorry Sub. I keep forgetting your growing inside. 🤪
When i was growing inside i used a water bottle sprayer with Water, Alcohol, and a little dish soap mix to kill Mites. Sometimes i also added Garlic.
Kills them on contact and they dont like the taste either. 😁 Just keep your alcohol at about a 30% mix. Let it set for about 30mins and then spray it off with fresh water.
You do this during your lights off period I hope
 

WeedHopper

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Nope. I raise my lights where i dont get anything on them and get it done. The difference is i have never grown in a tent. I build my own growroom.
 

bigsur51

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Now I’m wondering how they got in there. I’ll bet from my organic dirt humm… don’t want them again have to be prepared more next time. I know now that I must have had them for a few weeks as I’ve seen the dots on the leaves for some time but because there didn’t appear to be any leaf damage and besides the dots looked healthy as can be to my novice eyes anyway, y’all picked right up on it, I’m so glad I posted an update…

1. will this kill my harvest?
2. Do I have time to get rid of them this late week 4 of flower?
3. Will I be smoking thrip infused weed at the end like @CrashMagnet s spider mite weed?



1. nope
2. yep
3. nope


someone gave me some good advice a long time ago about bug sprays…….follow the instructions on the label

a fee notes on Spinosad and Monterey Bt

there is a difference

i use Spinosad sparingly and prefer the Bt , but , the Bt does NOT kill thrips but the Spinosad does…

the big thing with Spinosad is that it kills good bugs too , like bees and butterfly’s , so it is banned in most commercial grows….

that and the fact that there is no data on the long term effects of smoking cannabis which contains Spinosad

C796E2F5-4D1F-4D56-A034-40F850572F9C.jpeg
6171A1D1-83D0-46BD-91D1-A25FFD2426CE.jpeg



How Does Spinosad Kill Insects?
So, how does this wonder product work? Saccharopolyspora spinosa is toxic to pests and affects their nervous systems. Once spinosad is applied to the plant, insect larvae will feed on the substance and will die within a day or two. Spinosad will cause the insect’s muscles to flex uncontrollably, which leads to paralysis and eventually death. It’s most effective when the larvae eat it, but simply walking over it is usually enough to do some damage.

Spinosad can kill a wide variety of insects, including fire ants, fruit flies, leafminers, mites, mosquitoes, spider mites, and thrips. This relatively new insect killer is generally used on vegetables and fruit along with other garden species. Many organic gardeners use BT to take care of caterpillars and use spinosad spray for everything else.


Drawbacks Of Using Spinosad
The biggest drawback of spinosad that may deter home gardeners from using it is that it’s highly toxic to bees while the spray is wet. Timing is everything when it comes to spinosad. Bees are most active during the day, usually mid-morning to the late afternoon. Apply spinosad spray in the evening or very early morning to allow plenty of time to dry. The spray should take no more than three hours to dry completely.

Since spinosad spray is considered safe to use around bees once it’s dried, the dust and granules can be considered safe, as well. Still, you should wait until the bees aren’t active to take precautionary measures. Take the extra step and avoid applying spray, dust, or granules on flowers or anywhere else you see bees frequently land on.

Another concern is that spinosad is moderately toxic to earthworms. You can avoid harming worms by making sure only to apply it to plants as needed. Using granules for fire ant treatment will certainly pose risk to the worms, so try to avoid using it around your garden beds or other places where you’d like to keep the worms safe.

Finally, spinosad is slightly toxic to humans, animals, birds, and fish. This toxicity is incredibly low. If it comes into contact with your skin or eyes, the only problems you should experience are irritation and redness. Animals may have a similar reaction if they should come into contact with it.


Spinosad concentrates are intended to be mixed with water before you apply them to plants. Mixing it with water will dilute it to a safe amount so you won’t end up harming the wrong insects or yourself. The label of the product will tell you the exact measurements. You’ll need to measure out the proper amount of liquid and mix it into water. It’s usually a few tablespoons per gallon, but this may change depending on the product. Once it’s properly proportioned, you can begin spraying it on your plants as directed.

For both kinds of spinosad liquid spray, you should apply it to the tops and bottoms of the leaves as well as on stems. You should spray it wherever you see pests and larvae. Remember, avoid spraying flowers to keep the bees safe, and avoid spraying the soil if you can. You can spray larvae directly, but it’s when they eat sprayed leaves that you’ll find it to be the most effective. If you see eggs on your plants, you’ll need to spray again in a few days after the eggs have hatched.



and for the purists out there…

HOMEMADE ALTERNATIVE TO SPINOSAD
Despite being organic (and highly effective) we still don’t know the possible long-term effects and that it’s more than enough for a lot of home growers and commercial cannabis growers to avoid spinosad. On top of that, there are a lot of alternatives to spinosad so if you’re looking for a broad-spectrum insecticide you may get the same results with other natural products, insecticidal soaps, or even with your own DIY alcohol mix, such as the following:



IngredientAmount
Homemade Alternative to Spinosad
Isopropyl alcohol3 tablespoons
Mint5 medium-sized leaves
Garlic juice3 tablespoons
Cinnamon2 teaspoons
Lemon juice3 tablespoons


Remember that you don’t need all the ingredients mentioned in the table, as long as you at least get the alcohol, and one ingredient more it should work but the more you add the stronger the result. So once you have the ingredients, mix all of them in a small bowl and then dilute one teaspoon per 600ml of water, preferably in a blender.
 

RosterMan

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Maybe I could spray them right befor their bedtime
Not sure , I always got up an hr before lights on and did my spraying using a green light. and shook them off the best I could with the fans on. Im sure others have spray at lights off as long as the humidity is low enough to avoid any molding.
 

RosterMan

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1. nope
2. yep
3. nope


someone gave me some good advice a long time ago about bug sprays…….follow the instructions on the label

a fee notes on Spinosad and Monterey Bt

there is a difference

i use Spinosad sparingly and prefer the Bt , but , the Bt does NOT kill thrips but the Spinosad does…

the big thing with Spinosad is that it kills good bugs too , like bees and butterfly’s , so it is banned in most commercial grows….

that and the fact that there is no data on the long term effects of smoking cannabis which contains Spinosad

View attachment 301682 View attachment 301683


How Does Spinosad Kill Insects?
So, how does this wonder product work? Saccharopolyspora spinosa is toxic to pests and affects their nervous systems. Once spinosad is applied to the plant, insect larvae will feed on the substance and will die within a day or two. Spinosad will cause the insect’s muscles to flex uncontrollably, which leads to paralysis and eventually death. It’s most effective when the larvae eat it, but simply walking over it is usually enough to do some damage.

Spinosad can kill a wide variety of insects, including fire ants, fruit flies, leafminers, mites, mosquitoes, spider mites, and thrips. This relatively new insect killer is generally used on vegetables and fruit along with other garden species. Many organic gardeners use BT to take care of caterpillars and use spinosad spray for everything else.


Drawbacks Of Using Spinosad
The biggest drawback of spinosad that may deter home gardeners from using it is that it’s highly toxic to bees while the spray is wet. Timing is everything when it comes to spinosad. Bees are most active during the day, usually mid-morning to the late afternoon. Apply spinosad spray in the evening or very early morning to allow plenty of time to dry. The spray should take no more than three hours to dry completely.

Since spinosad spray is considered safe to use around bees once it’s dried, the dust and granules can be considered safe, as well. Still, you should wait until the bees aren’t active to take precautionary measures. Take the extra step and avoid applying spray, dust, or granules on flowers or anywhere else you see bees frequently land on.

Another concern is that spinosad is moderately toxic to earthworms. You can avoid harming worms by making sure only to apply it to plants as needed. Using granules for fire ant treatment will certainly pose risk to the worms, so try to avoid using it around your garden beds or other places where you’d like to keep the worms safe.

Finally, spinosad is slightly toxic to humans, animals, birds, and fish. This toxicity is incredibly low. If it comes into contact with your skin or eyes, the only problems you should experience are irritation and redness. Animals may have a similar reaction if they should come into contact with it.


Spinosad concentrates are intended to be mixed with water before you apply them to plants. Mixing it with water will dilute it to a safe amount so you won’t end up harming the wrong insects or yourself. The label of the product will tell you the exact measurements. You’ll need to measure out the proper amount of liquid and mix it into water. It’s usually a few tablespoons per gallon, but this may change depending on the product. Once it’s properly proportioned, you can begin spraying it on your plants as directed.

For both kinds of spinosad liquid spray, you should apply it to the tops and bottoms of the leaves as well as on stems. You should spray it wherever you see pests and larvae. Remember, avoid spraying flowers to keep the bees safe, and avoid spraying the soil if you can. You can spray larvae directly, but it’s when they eat sprayed leaves that you’ll find it to be the most effective. If you see eggs on your plants, you’ll need to spray again in a few days after the eggs have hatched.



and for the purists out there…

HOMEMADE ALTERNATIVE TO SPINOSAD
Despite being organic (and highly effective) we still don’t know the possible long-term effects and that it’s more than enough for a lot of home growers and commercial cannabis growers to avoid spinosad. On top of that, there are a lot of alternatives to spinosad so if you’re looking for a broad-spectrum insecticide you may get the same results with other natural products, insecticidal soaps, or even with your own DIY alcohol mix, such as the following:



Homemade Alternative to Spinosad
IngredientAmount
Isopropyl alcohol3 tablespoons
Mint5 medium-sized leaves
Garlic juice3 tablespoons
Cinnamon2 teaspoons
Lemon juice3 tablespoons


Remember that you don’t need all the ingredients mentioned in the table, as long as you at least get the alcohol, and one ingredient more it should work but the more you add the stronger the result. So once you have the ingredients, mix all of them in a small bowl and then dilute one teaspoon per 600ml of water, preferably in a blender.
Big
What about using dissolved Mosquitoes dunks to drench the soil
 

bigsur51

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Haha I was just being serious , I don't care if you like me as much as Big (He is a Great guy who knows a lot) But there are others who have been around the block who do try to help you, I almost do not answer your posts anymore due to the fact I get blown off. If you like I won't chime in again if I am an annoyance.


I love you too Amigo!
 

SubmarineGirl

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I was just reviewing my notes , 4weeks into flower and then try not to use the soap mix on flowers , I was using BT right up to flower as weekly preventative.
I made mistake of using Neem soap on late flowering plant yrs back and it stank like crappy wash floor water ,
Im sure Big will chime in and decide what organic method is best.
You could look into doing a soil drench to kill the ones living in the soil.
We are all Good Subgal ,
What’s a soil drench?
 

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